Gang

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Gang

An organized group (often rather small) of persons with a common identity. The term is usually used to describe organized crime groups, especially those run by racial and ethnic minorities. As with most organized crime groups, gangs have symbols, rituals and are generally involved in drug trafficking and other illegal activities. Gangs and other organized crime groups pose a significant and persistent problem for law enforcement. See also: RICO.
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Youth gangs in El Salvador and neighboring countries became transnational, in part, because as anthropology (https://www.
An example of a multidisciplinary, integrated approach to reducing youth gang involvement and violence is the Youth & Police Initiative (YPI) developed by the North American Family Institute (NAFI) in which groups of community law enforcement agents are paired with at-risk teens from high-crime neighborhoods to discuss drug use, violence, gang activity, and youth-police interactions.
From Wannabes to Youth Offenders: Youth Gangs' in Counties Manukau--Research Report (Ministry of Social Development 2008) classified gangs into four groups: wannabes, territorial gang, unaffiliated youth gang and affiliated criminal youth gang.
110-197) would provide $8 million to the State Department to combat criminal youth gangs, an increase of $3 million from the Administration's request.
But the dual policies of incarceration and deportation have not rid the United States of its homegrown youth gangs.
To deal with gang activity, 36 percent of responding agencies that experienced gang problems in 2004, had a specialized unit of at least two officers who primarily handled youth gang matters.
Whether or not you are a member of a youth gang, there are challenges that you face as a young person that are different from those of adults.
Revised from 1982) Crime by Youth Gangs and Groups in the United States.
In East Los Angeles, Moore (1985) observed that the social isolation and stigmatization experienced by Chicanos played key roles in the development of both an urban underclass and the establishment of youth gangs.
Naming names of both offenders and the cities, towns and First Nations where they're active, Cote explained the meaning of gang graffiti, hand gestures and the way youth gang members are initiated into adult gangs.
Finally he discusses the decline of postwar youth gangs in the 1960s and the resurgence of a different kind of youth gang in the 1970s.
Beyond the sizable increases in article output that appeared in the last three or four years of the study period, that the total number of gang articles is approximately equal in number to those on juvenile delinquency is noteworthy, since youth gang issues should be only a subset of the broader category of juvenile delinquency.

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