YAWN

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YAWN

Young and Wealthy but Normal. Self-made wealthy young persons (usually under 35) who live fairly simply. That is, YAWNs tend not to buy fancy cars and houses, but rather work hard and spend time with their families. YAWNs contrast with yuppies, who embrace their wealth rather more ostentatiously. It can be difficult to market products to YAWNs, though some are noted for their philanthropy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research suggests that yawning is triggered involuntarily when you see others yawn as it is hard-wired into our brains because of a human trait, "echophenomenon.
Contagious yawning is triggered involuntarily when we observe another person yawn -- it is a common form of echophenomena -- the automatic imitation of another's words (echolalia) or actions (echopraxia).
Scientists at Durham University have shown conclusively for the first time that unborn babies yawn repeatedly in the womb.
Relatives were most likely to spark off yawns in each other, followed by friends, acquaintances and lastly strangers.
Much like a human yawn, in fact, and the yawns were found to be more frequent in a warm room than in a cold one but most frequent of all during periods when the temperature was rising.
Inversely, subjects in experiments suppress yawns if participants know they are being watched.
According to an evolutionary psychologist, it is contrary to what had been heard informally; dog owners have claimed that they catch their dogs' yawns, but their dogs never yawned when they did.
Monika Smith (trans) The Big Yawn Gecko Press, 2009 32pp NZ$18.
Compare that with how often humans catch yawns from each other: just 45 to 60 percent of the time
Diet Pepsi Max is designed to offer a great-tasting solution with a unique formula that invigorates the mind and body, preventing ill-timed yawns from taking over.
The man yawns widely, then seconds later the dog yawns too.
When some one yawns, his or her alertness is heightened, as the sudden intake of oxygen increases the heart rate, rids the lungs and the bloodstream of the carbon dioxide build-up, and forces oxygen through blood vessels in the brain, while restoring normal breathing and ventilating the lungs.