Working Class

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Working Class

The class of persons who perform physical labor, skilled labor, domestic duties or similar tasks. Persons in the working class often earn an hourly wage and many (though far from all) have low job security. Examples of those with working class occupations include food servers, miners and construction workers. Some, though not all, are poorly paid. The working class is closely related to, but distinct from, the working poor. See also: Blue collar.
References in periodicals archive ?
These voters, as we shall see, are open to an expansive Democratic economic agenda--to more benefits for child care and higher education, to tax hikes on the wealthy, to investment in infrastructure spending, and to economic policies that lead employers to boost salaries for middle- and working-class Americans, especially women.
Other key aspects of working-class culture that she reads in the lyrics of country songs include an emphasis on self-control rather than environmental control in the face of hardships (e.
I hope that you enjoy your excursion into working-class writing and that you will share your copy of WLT with those who ask, "But is there such a thing as working-class writing?
It is not yet socially acceptable to publicly demonize working-class people to the extent that is done in Britain, but Canadians and Americans are getting close to that point.
Even when later serving in Germany, when pyjamas were issued because of the severe winters there, the working-class soldiers declined to wear them even though the garments, as I recall, were of excellent quality.
I will begin by tracing the ways in which working-class culture has typically been drawn according to a divide between self-interest and disinterest.
The view that it isn't acceptable to brandish the lower classes as chavs is a sentiment shared in part by artist Alexander Millar who depicts the working-class heritage of both his childhood home in Scotland and his adopted home in the North East in much of his work.
By comparison, white working-class voters in nonunion households do not undergo this socialization experience, and as a consequence, they may turn to other outlets and institutions for political information, such as their church, where a more socially conservative message is often popular.
Yet, while regional variations in experience are acknowledged, the uniformity of working-class life is emphasized, and minorities and other sub-cultures are almost entirely absent, even in the forward-looking conclusion.
In a recent article, author Janet Galligani Casey described the isolation and identity conflict experienced by working-class students who, in the upper-middle class culture of college, feel estranged from their homes and neighborhoods: "Not fully comfortable in their new cultural settings, they discover that they are also irrevocably separated from their pasts" (Casey, 2005).
Racial difference, sexual orientation difference or gender difference can be celebrated because they don't threaten the ideals of the institution, whereas working-class pride is something that upsets the ideals of the institution.
Frank presents the shift to the right in the historically Democratic Midwestern state of Kansas as a case study of right-leaning working-class Americans across the country.