Workfare


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Workfare

A somewhat informal term for government benefits or other aid given in exchange for state-sponsored work. Workfare labor may or may not be compensated, but, if it is, the government is responsible for payment. Workfare contrasts with welfare, in which recipients have few requirements beyond low income.
References in periodicals archive ?
This political history of the shift from welfare to workfare offers a trenchant analysis worthy of attention from welfare scholars and anyone seeking to understand the broader transformations referred to as neoliberalism.
They were protesting at the Workfare system which they said forced benefit claimants to work for nothing or lose their benefit.
The authors explore the possibility that workfare programs, which require beneficiaries to work on local public works projects in order to receive benefits, could increase the opportunity cost of schooling, lowering human capital investment even as incomes increase due to increased labor demand.
In 2001, when increasing numbers of unemployed individuals applied for MLSS assistance, the government began to add workfare measures to the MLSS (p.
Other organisations such as some local charities would be best committing to avoiding using Workfare, and follow Caerphilly's excellent example.
Claimants are twice as likely to be sanctioned on a workfare scheme than get a job at the end and some companies managing the placements, appallingly, refer 45% of people on them for sanctions.
This paper argues that despite the absence of the term 'paternalism' in relevant government discourse, paternalism is nonetheless a substantial characteristic of workfare policy.
IF you can be found a job on Workfare the company taking you should pay you a proper wage.
So there was a lukewarm reception to his announcement on workfare despite the fact his party clearly love it.
He wrote: "Unite was more than disappointed with the decision taken by the Labour front bench to abstain, failing to oppose the government's attempts to shore up its failing workfare scheme.
Marx's ambitions in Capital, it will be argued, continue to meet Therborn's challenge even in the historically distant field of Australian workfare, where, it is suggested, the extant literature reflects certain theoretical limitations.
The outcry surrounding the government's Workfare scheme, under which young unemployed people work up to eight weeks unpaid while keeping their benefits, shows the difficulty in addressing unemployment and welfare.

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