work


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Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

work

see JOB.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have a philosophy that all employees want to lead active, productive lives and work is a key part of that.
The MoCA also turned to domestic institutions of higher education for intellectual support by re-establishing social work education programs that had briefly existed in some universities prior to 1949.
Or might an artist be drawn to a work because something about it is distant from her own practice?
Like all work we do for a living, knowledge work is of value to someone else--so we are paid for our work.
Morris has lived to regret moments when he allowed work to take precedence over pressing family matters.
Fukunishi (1999) compared traumatic digit amputation (not limited to work injuries) and burn injury groups, and reported that PTSD was more common in the burn group (35%) as compared to the amputation group (18.
Third, although women and men work side-by-side in similar kinds of jobs, their workplace practices continue to be shaped by a deeply gendered workplace culture.
The comparison of the heart rate and rectal temperature during work in the heat between the two work bouts revealed that rectal temperature and heart rate were significantly higher in the second work bout when compared to the first work bout.
Some retirees who have experienced a high level of satisfaction in their preretirement work continue working part-time for their preretirement employer or seek similar employment from a new employer.
I have seen instances where a subcontractor did not purchase the required insurance before the work began, but purchased it a couple of weeks into the work.
For instance, in San Francisco we've found that more than half of those interested in work want to do something very different from what they did before disability.
For example, some scholars call for a social work knowledge base and profession that is variously African (Osei, 1996), or Indian (Nagpaul, 1996).