Window

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Window

A brokerage firm's cashier department, where delivery of securities and settlement of transactions take place.

Window

1. A physical place at a bank or brokerage where a customer goes to receive services. For example, a client may approach a window at a bank to deposit a check or make a withdrawal. Likewise, a client goes to a window at a brokerage to settle an account or deliver and receive securities.

2. A time during which it would be advantageous to conduct a certain transaction. For example, an investor has a window in which to make a profit on a security by buying while the price tends to rise and selling when it tends to fall.

window

A period of time during which an action can be expected to generate a successful result. For example, underwriters may have a window for corporate debt issues sandwiched between two periods of heavy U.S. Treasury offerings.
References in classic literature ?
cried his wife, showing her horror-stricken face through the window-panes.
There the conquered athlete lay: outwardly an inert mass of strength, formidable to look at, even in its fall; inwardly, a weaker creature, in all that constitutes vital force, than the fly that buzzed on the window-pane.
The older man, with his feet upon the opposite seat and his arms folded, was looking pensively through the rain-splashed window-pane into the impenetrable darkness.
Then after slipping his braces off his shoulders he pulled up violently the venetian blind, and leaned his forehead against the cold window-pane - a fragile film of glass stretched between him and the enormity of cold, black, wet, muddy, inhospitable accumulation of bricks, slates, and stones, things in themselves unlovely and unfriendly to man.
She stared out of the window with her lips pinched together, and it seemed quite natural that the rain should have begun to pour down in gray slanting lines and splash and stream down the window-panes.
Its girls sat on their stools at the switchboard until the window-panes were broken by the heat.
Nevertheless, he sought society; for on Sunday, when the ladies Rochefeuille, Monsieur de Houppeville and the new habitues, Onfroy, the chemist, Monsieur Varin and Captain Mathieu, dropped in for their game of cards, he struck the window-panes with his wings and made such a racket that it was impossible to talk.