Will


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Will

A document stating how and to whom a person wants his/her property transferred after death. In addition to transferring property, a will may specify how certain responsibilities are to be performed. For example, a will may state who shall take care of the decedent's minor children, how they are to be educated, and so forth. A court must enforce the provisions of a will unless there is some overriding legal reason for it not to do so. Many advisers recommend writing a will to ensure that the writer's wishes are carried out.

Will.

A will is a legal document you use to transfer assets you have accumulated during your lifetime to the people and institutions you want to have them after your death.

The will also names an executor -- the person or people who will carry out your wishes.

You can leave your assets directly to your heirs, or you can use your will to establish one or more trusts to receive the assets and distribute them at some point in the future.

The danger of dying without a will is that a court in the state where you live will decide what happens to your assets. Its decision may not be what you would have chosen, and its deliberations can be costly and delay settling your estate.

will

An instrument by which a person directs the disposition of assets after death.At one time the term will referred to disposition of real property, and a testament was a disposition of personal property,hence the expression “last will and testament.”Today,will covers all properties. See also holographic will (handwritten), nuncupative will (oral), intestate succession (dying without a will), and escheat (dying with no will and no heirs).
References in classic literature ?
Away from those fabulous songs did I lead you when I taught you: "The Will is a creator.
All "It was" is a fragment, a riddle, a fearful chance--until the creating Will saith thereto: "But thus would I have it.
Hath the Will become its own deliverer and joy-bringer?
Something higher than all reconciliation must the Will will which is the Will to Power--: but how doth that take place?
It takes the legal mind, like mine, to tackle wills.
Anything's possible with a man cracked enough to make freak wills and not cracked enough to have them disputed on the ground of insanity.
This seems to have soured the old boy on the nephew, for in the first of his wills that I've seen--you remember I told you I had seen three--he leaves the niece the pile and the nephew only gets twenty pounds.
It looks to me as if these eccentric wills of old Nutcombe's came in cycles, as it were.
This will do; but why you women always stick tassels and fringe all over a sofa-cushion, to tease and tickle a fellow, is what I don't understand.
cause you look as if you were more tired of studying than Will," said Maud, with some hesitation, but an evident desire to be useful and agreeable.
I heard Will talking about Publics and Privates, and I meant to ask him, but I forgot.
This setting forth of the characters in the story will remind you a little perhaps of Chaucer in his Prologue to the Canterbury Tales.