Wider

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Wider

Slang; in bond trading, an increase in yield spread, indicating greater risk.
References in classic literature ?
The porridge, sweetened with some dry brown sugar from an old store which he had refrained from using for himself, stopped the cries of the little one, and made her lift her blue eyes with a wide quiet gaze at Silas, as he put the spoon into her mouth.
As when farr off at Sea a Fleet descri'd Hangs in the Clouds, by AEQUINOCTIAL Winds Close sailing from BENGALA, or the Iles Of TERNATE and TIDORE, whence Merchants bring Thir spicie Drugs: they on the trading Flood Through the wide ETHIOPIAN to the Cape Ply stemming nightly toward the Pole.
Oh, go with me; if we five are together, we shall easily travel through the wide world.
Thus was he worming his way behind the guard when the latter straightened up, opened his cavernous mouth in a wide yawn, and stretched his arms above his head.
They soon began to ascend the mountains, and occasionally had wide prospects over the surrounding country.
Though my eyes and ears had been wide open during my audience with the jeddak and my various passages through the palace, I had seen or heard nothing of Dejah Thoris or Thuvia of Ptarth.
The lake is a mile wide, here, and maintains about that width from this point to its northern extremity--which is distant sixteen miles: from here to its southern extremity--say fifteen miles--it is not over half a mile wide in any place, I should think.
All along each side of this wide pathway that pierces the kraal were ranged hundreds of women, brought out by curiosity to look at us.
Within the dense shadows of the skeel grove, in a wide avenue beneath o'erspreading foliage, a flier hung a dozen feet above the ground.
He sought and found a wide game trail and at last his nostrils were rewarded with the scent of the fresh spoor of Bara, the deer.
No, not very wide," the Guide answered; "about the same as in England and America.
It was, as I remember it, a lard pail, very wide across the top, and without a cover.