agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
We explain that their gums will be protected with a barrier before the whitening agent is applied and that the dentist-supervised procedure involves little to no discomfort.
Giniger, "This gel contains proprietary ingredients to achieve clinically longer lasting, whiter results without the use of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide as a primary whitening agent in the gel.
Application: Flourescent whitening agents added to a BCTMP or BCTMP-kraft furnish reduce the photoyellowing properties of paper containing high yield pulp.
SHMP is used as an anti-microbial adjunct in beverages, for tartar control and as a whitening agent in oral care products.
For the average person, a quick trip to the drug store for an over-the-counter whitening agent usually yields a very subtle lightening of the teeth.
Market Analysis III-16 Outlook III-16 Overview of the European Skin Whitening Market III-16 An Insight into the Skin Whitening Agents Market III-16 A Focus on the UK Market for Skin Lighteners III-17 Continued Availability of Hydroquinone-based Cosmetics Raises Concerns III-17 Product Launches III-17 Key Players III-18 B.
The market for retail dental care essentials is segregated into dental brushes, whitening agents, specialized dental pastes and dental wash solutions.
In addition to the cost savings, TicaPAN 311 is whiter in colour and can reduce the overall amount of titanium dioxide or other whitening agents.
He estimated that the chemicals are 100 times more effective in reducing melanin pigmentation than the common skin whitening agents kojic acid and arbutin, which have been used in cosmetics for more than 30 years.
According to the company, clinical studies have shown Nivitol to be up to 20 times more effective than the leading whitening agents such as hydroquinone and kojic acid.
The granted claims are directed to hygroscopic and waterless foamable carriers and foams based on polyol or polyethylene glycol polar solvents, as well as pharmaceutical compositions that contain a variety of drugs, including antibacterial agents, antifungals, antiviral agents, antiparasitic agents, keratolytic agents, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), anti-allergic agents, anticancer agents, local anesthetics, retinoids, photodynamic therapy agents, anti-wrinkle agents, skin whitening agents, immunosuppressants and immunomodulators.
Salty, spicy, hot, or acidic foods (especially fresh pineapple), and toothpastes with heavy flavoring or whitening agents can cause a flare-up.