GO

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Related to went: Wentworth, went off

General Obligation Bond

In the United States, a municipal bond in which the issuing locality pledges to use all revenues at its disposal to pay bondholders, including the raising of property taxes. Should a sufficient number of residents not pay their property taxes that it impacts revenue for bondholders, the terms of the bond legally require the municipality to raise property taxes to make up the shortfall. There are two basic types of general obligation bonds. A limited GO allows for the raising of property taxes up to a certain percentage, while an unlimited GO theoretically allows the municipality to levy taxes of up to 100% of a property's value. Because an unlimited GO provides a great incentive to pay property tax on time, and because many states only allow such a bond to be issued following a vote on the matter, credit ratings agencies usually rate them higher. However, both types of GO are generally rated highly.

Goes

To trade, especially at a given price. For example, one may say that a stock "goes" at $10, meaning that one may trade at its current share price of $10.

GO

References in classic literature ?
At nine they stopped work, and sang, as usual, before they went to bed.
I waited until all was quiet and the old people were asleep, then raised my window, climbed out, and went softly through the yard.
While I was cooking supper the old man took a swig or two and got sort of warmed up, and went to ripping again.
A deep peal of thunder went rolling and tumbling down the heavens and lost itself in sullen rumblings in the distance.
We waited a long time, but he didn't come back any more, or if he did he come around the other way; so at last we was tuckered out and went to sleep and had nightmares, a million of them.
The Princess went with her sisters to the window and looked on at the tournament.
Meanwhile the others went on getting dinner ready about the buildings, {21} jeering at him tauntingly as they did so.
At Oakbourne, the ostler at the Royal Oak remembered such a young woman as Adam described getting out of the Treddleston coach more than a fortnight ago--wasn't likely to forget such a pretty lass as that in a hurry--was sure she had not gone on by the Buxton coach that went through Snowfield, but had lost sight of her while he went away with the horses and had never set eyes on her again.
Before the castle gate all was as the fox had said: so the son went in and found the chamber where the golden bird hung in a wooden cage, and below stood the golden cage, and the three golden apples that had been lost were lying close by it.
He discovered that the three pages he had read had made no impression on him at all; and he went back and started from the beginning: he found himself reading one sentence over and over again; and now it weaved itself in with his thoughts, horribly, like some formula in a nightmare.
To put an end to the matter, we went upstairs, and asked the traffic superintendent, and he told us that he had just met a man, who said he had seen it at number three platform.
I run away from Sunday School -- and went fishing with the Cottons -- and I told ever so many whoppers to Mrs.