water table

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Related to water tables: aquifer, steam tables

water table

The upper limit of the saturated area of the earth containing groundwater.The water table will be at varying depths depending on location and time of year.

References in periodicals archive ?
Investigation of the effect of different subsurface drainage systems on the water table components and water table depths were two of the main objectives of this pilot study considered in this paper.
The water table has been going down by an average of 3 feet every year for the past three decades.
Analyses of one mammillary from the western Grand Canyon region suggest that when the deposit stopped growing some 17 million years ago, the water table stood about 1,160 meters above today's river level.
In the Pakistani part of the fertile Punjab plain, the drop in water tables appears to be similar to that in India.
As water tables fall, well drillers are using modified oil-drilling technology to reach water, going as deep as 1,000 meters in some locations.
One would think that falling water tables and rivers and wells running dry would ring alarm bells, launching immediate and vigorous water conservation measures.
High water tables are also shown west of Erringer Road and south of Los Angeles Avenue, and adjacent to the Arroyo Simi, he said.
Liquefaction can occur when high water tables and poorly compacted soils are shaken in a quake and become a kind of quicksand that can topple an unsecured building.
Endres has asserted for the past fifteen years that the Playa Vista site is unique, unlike any site in the area: "the danger of explosion from oil field gas migrating up some 300 abandoned and operating oil wells combined with liquefiable soils, high water tables, seismic activity and Playa Vista's close proximity to the Southern California Gas Company's oilfield gas storage operations creates a recipe for disaster.
Liquefaction occurs on land with high water tables and sandy soil.
The Abbotsford area is typical of major poultry site operations in that it is experiencing serious nitrate pollution to local water tables because of the spreading of chicken manure on fields, which is currently one of the only practical methods of disposal.
Liquefaction zones are plagued by sandy soil and high water tables, which amplify ground movement during earthquakes, increasing the likelihood of building damage.