waiver


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Waiver

A statement of the voluntary surrender of a right. For example, suppose a company provides customers a service that might be dangerous, such as bungee jumping. The company may require customers to sign a waiver relinquishing the right to sue the company for negligence if a problem occurs. This reduces the company's risk in the conduct of its business.

waiver

The voluntary relinquishment of a known right, remedy, claim, or privilege.
References in periodicals archive ?
Different types of immigration waivers also exist that can help individuals avoid penalties for certain events in their past.
Washington has not been able to keep all of its commitments," Secretary Duncan wrote in the email informing the state it was losing its waiver because of its teacher evaluation method.
Overall, previous research suggests that we must distinguish between different waiver categories, evaluate attrition rates at multiple points in time (as short-term and long-term results may differ), and evaluate more than one performance metric.
However, although I know from experience that this criterion is waived in the North Carolina waiver, I still meet North Carolina families that say they do not qualify for the Waiver because someone at the Mental Health Center told them they made too much money.
The waiver would allow the department to spend money much more flexibly than they currently are.
An ABA report, also issued in August, provides "Examples of Potential Implementation Actions" that regulators can provide guidance for auditors on with respect to waiver, including:
I request that you take appropriate action to ensure that everyone in your acquisition and logistics communities is aware that a waiver to cite military specifications and standards in solicitations and contracts is no longer required.
In determining whether to grant a waiver, the service considers all relevant facts and circumstances; how taxpayers used the amount distributed (for example, for payments made by check, whether they cashed the check); and the time elapsed after the distribution.
This is important because states historically waited months, sometimes years, before decisions were made on their federal waiver requests.
Key among these services are those covered under the section 1915 (c) home and community-based waiver program.
The study also identifies any states that have utilized the Medicaid home and community-based waiver to develop special policies or programs for home health care needs of Medicaid recipients living in the community.