wage restraint


Also found in: Dictionary.

Wage Restraint

An agreement between an employee and an employer not to demand wage or salary increases. Wage restraint may occur when a company is facing losses or lower profits and needs to live within its means. The employee may receive concessions (such as better health insurance) in exchange for wage restraint.

wage restraint

see PRICES AND INCOMES POLICY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its aim, from Labor's view, was to secure union cooperation on wage restraint, so that productivity growth did not drive up inflation and unemployment.
The province is asking public sector employees for wage restraint in tough economic times in order to reign back its huge unsustainable deficit.
Years of wage restraint helped the German economy shake off the financial crisis and euro zone debt crisis more easily than peers, and an office monitoring wage developments in Germany said the current rise should not remain a one-off.
There is scope for the Government to boost growth through higher spending on infrastructure projects, which would increase employment and demand within the economy and could be funded within existing budgets by imposing further public sector wage restraint or reforming property taxes, it said.
FREDDIE LJUNGBERG salutes the news that Arsenal are poised to unlock their years of wage restraint and splash the cash this summer.
4 percent yearly, far below productivity growth, causing employment creation to not follow due to wage restraint.
In tough economic times, wage rises across the economy should be modest to help prevent job losses, but those on the lowest incomes shouldn't have to bear the full brunt of wage restraint.
It was the way MPs had hidden their pay rises from the public, so that they could argue wage restraint by example.
And he called on employers to exercise wage restraint and resist calls for pay packets to match the rising cost of living.
The lowest budget deficit was reported in a number of years, triggered by actions to contain fuel subsidies, wage restraint and better cash management.
Most German economists would say the former, because they think that wage restraint is exactly what Germany needs to get its economy going again.
The first of these is wage restraint (especially in the public sector) with direct provisions for job creation.