Vote

(redirected from voting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Los Angeles company that manages American Idol voting, told the magazine Broadcast and Cable that votes dialed at regular intervals indicate that the votes might have been machine-dialed.
Dawson said absentee voting is a sound method of casting a ballot.
However, newly aware of the stakes, risks, and intellectual challenges associated with voting equipment, computer scientists and mathematicians specializing in encryption are now avidly taking part in the search for dependable and inviolable voting technology.
Wholesale fraud, which was almost nonexistent in our Republic prior to the 1890s, erupted when mechanical lever voting machines were first put in use.
According to Passoff, As You Sow takes proxy, voting seriously because it doesn't take much to get a company's attention.
According to a January 2005 national poll, 82 percent of Americans from coast-to-coast believe that DC residents deserve full voting representation.
Republican operatives have long understood that elections tend to go better when voting rates are low, particularly in urban, predominantly minority precincts.
Another result of the Voting Rights Act was the creation of congressional districts made up almost entirely of blacks or Hispanics.
Exactly one year ago the Humanist ran a story about the unreliability of electronic voting machines, noting that they are programmed with unsecure software and are inauditable because they leave no paper trail.
2004 vote: I'm voting for John Kerry, though with little enthusiasm.
As a door-to-door campaigner for Proposition 200, Dove says he heard "verbal evidence from individuals on the street who said, 'Yes, illegal immigrants are voting.
I think the voting age should be left at 18 years of age," says Rebecca Todak, an eight-grader from Perrysburg, Ohio.