Vote

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Related to voting: Voting rights, Voting Rights Act of 1965

Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the two-hour voting window, callers who get through can vote as many times as their redial buttons allow.
More than half of the votes cast for the city elections in April were done through absentee voting, City Clerk Sharon Dawson said.
But whether they are the best option remains to be seen, and the search for the most practical and secure voting technology goes on.
But with the 2002 passage by Congress of the landmark Sarbanes-Oxley Act, mutual funds and other representative brokers must now reveal their proxy voting records for public perusal.
The United States of America is violating international law when it denies DC residents equal voting rights in Congress.
Perhaps the most notorious voter suppression tactic is perfectly legal: Six states, including Florida, bar exfelons who have served their sentences from voting for the rest of their lives.
The Voting Rights Act effectively ended the use of literacy tests and poll taxes, allowed federal officials to register voters, and required some Southern states to get permission from a federal court or the Attorney General before changing voting practices.
In Gahanna, a suburb of Columbus, Ohio, an electronic voting machine gave Bush 4,258 votes to Kerry's 260.
I vaguely recall voting in '88 for Michael Dukakis, whose only positive attribute was that his last name wasn't Bush (as is the case with John F.
They said they were checking polls to see if illegal aliens were voting.
They cite poor voter turnout among 18- to 24-year olds as evidence that many young people do not take voting seriously.