Vote

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Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
References in classic literature ?
Bulstrode, in a subdued tone, "the merits of the question may be very briefly stated, and if any one present doubts that every gentleman who is about to give his vote has not been fully informed, I can now recapitulate the considerations that should weigh on either side.
I merely mean that you are expected to vote with Mr.
Wednesday, Robredo led the unofficial count with 13,952,128 votes or 35.
the Los Angeles company that manages American Idol voting, told the magazine Broadcast and Cable that votes dialed at regular intervals indicate that the votes might have been machine-dialed.
More than half of the votes cast for the city elections in April were done through absentee voting, City Clerk Sharon Dawson said.
Unlike voting systems in use today, these schemes would give voters a way to check that their votes were recorded as marked.
Without an investigation we can only guess how many votes can be cast illegally, but the Washington Times reported on October 26, 2002 that Larry Gray, a former sanitation director for Helena, Arkansas, pleaded guilty when charged with submitting more than 25 absentee ballots.
The interests of management often conflict with our interests as shareowners, which is why we have proxy votes in the first place," Latham says.
Her infamous "butterfly ballot"--designed, Gumbel notes deliciously, ostensibly to help elderly, mostly Democratic voters by enlarging the type-size of candidate names--likely deprived Al Gore of more than 2,000 votes, and, hence, the presidency.
In Selma, white officials, including the sheriff, were preventing most of its black residents from registering to vote.
In April 2004, the League of Women Voters began a survey of local and state election officials in a number of targeted states to identify potential problems that could put the votes of eligible voters at risk.
After reaching 32,000, the maximum number of votes that that particular software program could handle, the machine started subtracting votes instead of adding them.