Vote

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Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
References in classic literature ?
On the last occasion when the great Russian bugbear provoked a division, he voted submissively with his Conservative allies.
And to think that I once voted against that angel for Inspector of Gate-latches in Public Squares
As soon as the merry meal and a brief interval of repose were over, it was unanimously voted to have some charades.
He owned a country-house at Aulnay, laid by his money, and had, besides the four thousand five hundred francs of his salary under government, twelve hundred francs pension from the civil list, and eight hundred from the three hundred thousand francs fund voted by the Chambers for encouragement of the Arts.
Day by day unions and more unions voted their support to the socialists, until even Ernest laughed when the Undertakers' Assistants and the Chicken Pickers fell into line.
Peter sided with him, but the rest of us voted down the suggestion.
Seton next morning we liked him enormously, and voted him a jolly good fellow.
To learn how any representative or senator voted on the key measures described herein, look him up in the tables on pages 30-35.
Hagel not only won but won big, receiving a majority of the vote from every major demographic group in the state--including core Democrats such as Nebraska's black population, which had never voted Republican in modern times.
A woman currently bringing suit against Florida, on disability for blindness caused by diabetes and hepatitis, voted regularly in Florida for 25 years before being informed that she was disqualified because of a felony committed when she was 19.
Direct election would have another enjoyable by-product: No partisan results in exit polls in the Presidential race could be discussed by a credible news agency until everyone had voted.
When voters went to the polls on November 7, they actually voted for a group of people called electors.