Vote

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Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decision to test and implement the Social Voting platform provided by Silicon Valley based Votable was not an easy one, said General Manager Courtney Rush in an interview prior to this publication; “Within the Aerospace and Defense market, smaller companies like ours do not have the resources to take advantage of latest technologies.
Building on those recommendations, there have been a number of adjustments made to private Members' business since the mid-1980s, including: the ordering of items caused by the absence of MPs; an increase in the number of days which private Members' business would be considered; and, allowing each item in the Order of Precedence to be votable unless procedurally inadmissible or unless its sponsor opts to make it non-votable.
Highlights of these changes include simplification of the rules governing lengths of speeches and splitting of time during debates, new rules governing debates on concurrence in Committee reports, an increase in the number of Supply Days for the supply period ending June 23, 2005, and specification that every opposition motion now be votable unless its sponsor decides otherwise.
Under the (provisional) new rules for Private Members' Business, all items are now votable unless the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business recommends otherwise.
These Standing Orders make almost all items of private members' business votable.
When the House passed a motion directing the procedure and House affairs committee to make all private members' business votable, the government's first reaction was to throw up its hands and give up.
The Report will have the effect of rendering all items of Private Members' business votable unless the sponsoring Member doesn't wish the matter to be voted upon, or they are found to be "non-admissible" by a panel consisting of one Member from each recognized party in the House.
Ainsi, toute affaire emanant d'un depute sera votable a moins que le parrain demande qu'elle ne le soit pas ou que l'affaire ait ete jugee non recevable par un panel regroupant un depute de chaque parti reconnu a la Chambre.
The discussion was divided into four broad themes: the purpose of Private Members' Business; whether all items of Private Members' Business should be votable; the details of the selection of votable items; and whether more radical changes should be considered.
Menard added that when Members discerned that a Private Members' bill had been deemed votable but had not been voted on, many believed that a breach of their parliamentary privileges had occurred.