Volume

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Volume

This is the daily number of shares of a security that change hands between a buyer and a seller. Also known as volume traded. Also see Up volume and Down volume.

volume

The amount of trading sustained in a security or in the entire market during a given period. Especially heavy volume may indicate that important news has just been announced or is expected. See also average daily volume.

Volume.

Volume is the number of shares traded in a company's stock or in an entire market over a specified period, typically a day.

Unusual market activity, either higher or lower than average, is typically the result of some external event. But unusual activity in an individual stock reflects new information about that stock or the stock's sector.

References in periodicals archive ?
The problem with giving the solution to patients with signs of heart failure was volume overload.
Non-surgical patients and many of the higher risk surgical patients continue to be affected by the chronic volume overload caused by MR, which requires the heart to work harder, which may lead to heart failure and hospitalization.
Chronic renal insufficiency is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, hypertension, and chronic volume overload, which drive CHF's progression, said Dr.
Studies using I-131 tagged albumin have demonstrated plasma volume expansion in more than 50% of patients in whom clinical volume overload was not recognized.
The vast majority of patients with significant MR are untreated, which leaves their hearts affected by the chronic volume overload caused by MR, requiring the heart to work harder, and ultimately leading to heart failure.
Both in Europe and the United States, the vast majority of patients are untreated, which leaves their hearts affected by the chronic volume overload caused by MR, requiring the heart to work harder, and ultimately leading to heart failure.
In heart failure patients, mitral regurgitation contributes to a progressively deteriorating course of volume overload, decreased left ventricular function, and worsening heart failure symptoms.
The analytical methodology used identified that the crossover patients had a greater need for an oxygen carrier, likely related to patient age, volume overload and under-treatment.