capacity

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Related to vital capacity: tidal volume, total lung capacity, forced vital capacity

Capacity

Credit grantors' measurement of a person's ability to repay loans.

Capacity

The theoretical maximum number of products a company can produce at a given time. For example, an oil pump may have a capacity of X barrels per day, meaning that it cannot produce more than X. Companies rarely operate at full capacity, both to allow themselves leeway in the event of increased demand and because capacity may not be possible at a given time because of worker illness, machinery maintenance, or other reasons.

capacity

the maximum amount of output that a firm is physically capable of producing, at a point in time, given the fullest and most efficient use of its existing plant or plants.

Over time, a firm may adjust its capacity to meet changes in demand and the competitive situation facing it, investing in new plant or extending existing plant to meet an increase in demand, or closing down plant, permanently or temporarily (‘MOTHBALLING’), to meet a situation of OVERCAPACITY.

When preparing a PRODUCTION BUDGET, it is necessary to ensure that the firm has sufficient production capacity to meet planned output levels. A firm's capacity or the capacity of industry in general may be limited by the availability of capital equipment and labour.

The maximum rate of output which the firm can produce will depend upon the capacity of its individual factories which in turn depends upon the capacity of various departments and work stations within each factory See INPUT-OUTPUT CONTROL, PRODUCTION SCHEDULING, PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING. See CAPACITY UTILIZATION, LIMITING FACTOR, RATIONALIZATION, INDIVISIBILITIES, CAPACITY CONSTRAINED RESOURCE, CAPACITY CONTROL, CAPACITY CUSHION, CAPACITY PLANNING, CAPACITY REQUIREMENTS PLANNING.

capacity

  1. 1the maximum amount of output that a firm or industry is physically capable of producing given the fullest and most efficient use of its existing plant. In microeconomic theory, the concept of full capacity is specifically related to the cost structures of firms and industries. Industry output is maximized (i.e. full capacity is attained) when all firms produce at the minimum point on their long-run average total cost curves (see PERFECT COMPETITION). If firms fail to produce at this point, then the result is EXCESS CAPACITY.
  2. in macroeconomics, capacity refers to POTENTIAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT. The percentage relationship of actual output in the economy to capacity (i.e. potential national income) shows capacity utilization. See also MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION.

capacity

The legal ability of parties to enter into contracts.
• Full capacity. Having unlimited ability to enter into binding contracts of all types.
• Limited capacity. Having the ability to enter into binding contracts for certain things, such as a minor's contracts for necessities, but also having the ability to disaffirm other contracts upon reaching legal age, for example.
• No capacity. Having no ability to enter into contracts, such as one who has been adjudicat- ed as mentally incompetent.

References in periodicals archive ?
Many studies have documented differing changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) following various intensities and durations of exercise.
In addition, we found that the obese group had higher blood pressure and weaker cardiovascular function, including DP and vital capacity, than the normal group.
Elderly patients are usually unable to hold a vital capacity breath for a sufficient length of time because of inadequate cardiovascular and respiratory reserve.
9 kPa/l/s Test preparation Prospan[R] cough drops Comparator Placebo Dosage 35 mg/d ivy leaf dry extract Treatment duration 3 days (wash-out: 3-5 days) Efficacy objective Superiority of ivy leaf extract over placebo Primary outcome Airway resistance measure Secondary efficacy Intrathoracic gas volume, measures (body residual volume, plethysmography, vital capacity, spirometry) forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume Primary comparison Change between day 1 for efficacy outcome pre medication and day 3 measures at 3 h post dosing (morning dose) Trial B Reference Mansfeld et al.
The average 55-year-old functions at 40% of vital capacity when compared with the average 20-year-old (Kemp & Kleinplatz, 1985).
In comparing the two groups' medical records and multiphasic exam results, they found that forced vital capacity and blood levels of uric acid, a breakdown product of nucleic acid metabolism, emerged as two of of hypertension's most predictive risk factors.
By stepping up its commitment in this vital capacity, Vivint is demonstrating its leadership and support for the continued expansion of the entire U.
Researchers calculated a 95% confidence limit around the slopes of decline of ALSFRSr scores, forced vital capacity (FVC) and grip strength of the ProAct historical database subjects, and evaluated if trial subjects fell within or outside those limits.
10 percent decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) a measure indicative of the risk of mortality in IPF was significantly reduced in patients receiving Esbriet compared with patients receiving placebo at one year.
The 200 MW from the Aggreko power plant injects vital capacity into the local grid, helping to keep essential infrastructure and services running, while also ensuring power supplies are maintained to both business and domestic users.
The minimum requirements for basic office spirometers include forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV) and peak expiratory flow (PEF).
For this study, multiple lung function tests were performed and significant changes were noted in four measurements: the FVC, or forced vital capacity, which reflects the volume of air that can be blown out after fully inhaling; the FEV1, or forced expiratory volume in 1 second, which is the volume of air that can forcibly be blown out in one second, after fully inhaling; the FEF, or forced expiratory flow, which reflects the flow of air coming out of the lungs during the middle portion of a forced exhalation; and the PEF, or peak expiratory flow, which is the maximal flow achieved when air is forcibly exhaled immediately after being inhaled.