Load

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Load

The sales fee charged to an investor when shares are purchased in a load fund or annuity. See: Back-end load; front-end load; level load.

Load

A sales charge or commission one pays for purchasing a mutual fund. The charge is paid to the person(s) who sold the investor shares in the fund. There are three types of load. A front-end load occurs when the shareholder pays the fee when buying into the fund. A back-end load means that the investor pays when selling his/her shares. Finally, an investor with a level-load fund pays periodically throughout his/her time as a shareholder. Studies have shown that load funds perform neither better nor worse than no-load funds.

load

The sales fee the buyer pays in order to acquire an asset. This fee varies according to the type of asset and the way it is sold. Many mutual funds impose a sales charge. As a result of the load, only a portion of the investor's funds go into the investment itself. Also called front-end load, sales load.

Load.

If you buy a mutual fund through a broker or other financial professional, you pay a sales charge or commission, also called a load.

If the charge is levied when you purchase the shares, it's called a front-end load. If you pay when you sell shares, it's called a back-end load or contingent deferred sales charge. And with a level load, you pay a percentage of your investment amount each year you own the fund.

load

the work which is assigned to a workstation (machine or operative) during a specified period of time. See PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING.

Load

A load is a sales charge imposed when mutual fund shares are purchased or redeemed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the single most important finding is that people who reach an undetectable viral load with antiretroviral therapy (called medical controllers in this study) get admitted to the hospital significantly less often than elite controllers (people who maintain an undetectable viral load without the help of drugs).
The researchers speculate that the higher rate of untreated co-infections in Africa could be to blame, and cite a 2002 paper from Uganda that shows that a herpes attack can raise HIV viral load by 50%, active tuberculosis by 150%, and acute malaria by 370% (a nearly fivefold increase).
During the study, lead researcher John Crump and colleagues from Duke University examined Tanzanian infants born to HIV-infected parents and people with known HIV infections who needed monitoring of their viral loads.
So, for example, when a woman on HAART comes to me and says she wants to have a baby, there is no way to assure her, even if she has a below detectable plasma viral load, that it's safe to have unprotected sex.
While clinical malaria leads to at least short-term HIV viral load increases in adults (1,2), the effect of subclinical malaria is unclear, and even less is known about coinfection in children.
There were too few instances of virus with the K65R mutation in patients receiving the 200 mg dose to draw firm conclusions; however, the viral load reduction in patients with the K65R mutation treated with lower doses of Reverset suggests that the compound is also active against this mutation.
Multiple groups report continued viral replication even in patients with "undetectable" viral loads, suggesting that viral reservoirs persist even in the presence of suppressive therapy.
Patients who scored high in depression tended to show increases in viral load.
Different viral load cutoffs were analyzed using ROC curves.
I would weigh the CD4+ [T-cell] count probably a little bit more than the viral load, but you have to look at the whole clinical picture.
Viral load is a quantitative measurement of the number of HIV particles contained in an HIV-infected patient sample and is used as a tool to monitor the effectiveness of drug treatment regimes.
Neil Graham of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, one of several researchers who presented viral load studies last month during the International Conference on AIDS in Vancouver, British Columbia.