Bell

(redirected from vase)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to vase: Michaels

Bell

Signal on a stock exchange to indicate the open and close of trading.

Bell

A traditional bell that is rung to signify the beginning or the end of a trading day. The bell on the New York Stock Exchange is one of the more famous examples. As an increasing number of securities exchanges do most or all of their trading online, a bell has become a symbol or informal term for the beginning or the end of a trading day, rather than a description of a real bell.

bell

The device that sounds to mark the open and close of each trading day on an organized securities exchange.
References in classic literature ?
you might get some of the glass in your feet, ma'am," insisted the young woman, picking up bits of the broken vase that were scattered upon the carpet.
It was seen in his appreciating notice of the vase of flowers, the scent of which he inhaled with a zest almost peculiar to a physical organization so refined that spiritual ingredients are moulded in with it.
Here," she said, "is this vase I haven't any flowers for.
The hall, too, was scoured; and the great carved clock, as well as the steps and banisters of the staircase, were polished to the brightness of glass; in the dining-room, the sideboard flashed resplendent with plate; in the drawing-room and boudoir, vases of exotics bloomed on all sides.
To punish me, he shut me up in this vase of copper, and he put on the leaden cover his seal, which is enchantment enough to prevent my coming out.
My pockets had always puzzled Weena, but at the last she had concluded that they were an eccentric kind of vase for floral decoration.
And I say to you: one drop of water suffices to make the full vase overflow; one slight fault may draw down punishment upon the head spared, despite many crimes.
You cannot guess," said he, "what there is in that small vase, can you?
Your mother brought us a golden vase to hold them--gift of Bacchus, and work of Vulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those of Patroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also those of Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of your comrades now that Patroclus was no more.
So each one gave a little of the fire from their breasts, and placed the flame in a crystal vase, through which it shone and glittered like a star.
The young princess clapped her hands; and then, ashamed of having been betrayed into such a demonstration of joy, she half turned away and bent over a vase of roses, as if to inhale their odor.
On the summer afternoon of our tale a small round table, as black as ebony, stood in the centre of the room, sustaining a cut-glass vase of beautiful form and elaborate workmanship.