variety

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Variety

One of two or more types of the same line of coin. For example, all the pennies made in one year may include a line of 100 with a double die. A variety may affect the value of the coin.

variety

the number of products sold by a firm as part of its PRODUCT RANGE. A firm may make many different products and many variants of each product in order to appeal to most market segments and maximize its potential sales. However, the providing of variety can be expensive if this is associated with short production runs, high stockholding costs, complex production scheduling and high marketing costs. Consequently, firms may aim to eliminate unnecessary variety in products or components by means of variety-reduction programmes and STANDARDIZATION of components.

variety

the number of products sold by a firm as part of its product range. A firm may make many different products and many variants of each product in order to appeal to most MARKET SEGMENTS and maximize its potential sales. Providing variety can be expensive, however, as short production runs increase unit production costs and the promotion of a large number of brands increases marketing costs. Thus, as part of their PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION policies, firms often need to ‘trade off variety and STANDARDIZATION considerations.
References in classic literature ?
The different measures suited to the nine varieties of ground; the expediency of aggressive or defensive tactics; and the fundamental laws of human nature: these are things that must most certainly be studied.
These he cultivates with his own hands, and is said even to have produced new varieties of poison, more horribly deleterious than Nature, without the assistance of this learned person, would ever have plagued the world withal.
This smoothness added to the many varieties of her expression also that of child-like innocence.
And this rapidly growing familiarity (truly, she had a terrible gift for it) had all the varieties of earnestness: serious, excited, ardent, and even gay.
My little dog, too, was quite fat and up to all varieties of snuff.
Soon, however, I descended to details, and regarded with minute interest the innumerable varieties of figure, dress, air, gait, visage, and expression of countenance.
We speak of the keeping of a room as we would of the keeping of a picture - for both the picture and the room are amenable to those undeviating principles which regulate all varieties of art; and very nearly the same laws by which we decide on the higher merits of a painting, suffice for decision on the adjustment of a chamber.
The varieties in the fitting-up of the rooms, where the common necessaries provided by the owner, in the common indifferent plight, were contrasted with some few articles of a rare species of wood, excellently worked up, and with something curious and valuable from all the distant countries Captain Harville had visited, were more than amusing to Anne; connected as it all was with his profession, the fruit of its labours, the effect of its influence on his habits, the picture of repose and domestic happiness it presented, made it to her a something more, or less, than gratification.
She had grown tired of what people called "society"; New York was kind, it was almost oppressively hospitable; she should never forget the way in which it had welcomed her back; but after the first flush of novelty she had found herself, as she phrased it, too "different" to care for the things it cared about--and so she had decided to try Washington, where one was supposed to meet more varieties of people and of opinion.
And there are still some who think that, after all, the style is the man; justified, in very great varieties, by the simple consideration of what he himself has to say, quite independently of any real or supposed connection with this or that literary age or school.
In considering the Origin of Species, it is quite conceivable that a naturalist, reflecting on the mutual affinities of organic beings, on their embryological relations, their geographical distribution, geological succession, and other such facts, might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.
In the four succeeding chapters, the most apparent and gravest difficulties on the theory will be given: namely, first, the difficulties of transitions, or in understanding how a simple being or a simple organ can be changed and perfected into a highly developed being or elaborately constructed organ; secondly the subject of Instinct, or the mental powers of animals, thirdly, Hybridism, or the infertility of species and the fertility of varieties when intercrossed; and fourthly, the imperfection of the Geological Record.