Value Judgment

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Value Judgment

A decision based on what one believes is the right thing to do. The value involved may come from any number of sources. For example, one may make an investment decision based on one's moral values, one's view of the macroeconomic situation, and/or one's willingness to take risks. Often, value judgments occur when the correct decision is not immediately clear.
References in periodicals archive ?
All three authors recognize the importance of ethics and value judgments for policymaking, how economists and other social scientists often make implicit value judgments without making their underlying ethical systems explicit, and the importance of economics for explaining and understanding how a free society grounded in property rights contributes to human flourishing.
Veatch takes some issue with the interpretation and use of clinical guidelines that are built upon standardized value judgments.
Value judgments are substantive claims, and so presumably aren't analytic; but there doesn't seem to be any way to test them empirically, so they must not be synthetic either.
Value judgments are correlated with approach and avoidance reaction tendencies.
So what are all these value judgments that are attached to our supposed warts?
However, I am concerned the next generation is not being exposed to a wide variety of musical styles; consequently, they will have no foundational basis for making any value judgments about music or any of the arts.
and did not provide any significant additional protection, 4) based upon economic value judgments that are properly left to the owner of the records and the records manager, and 5) adopted by a prior committee that reflected the interests of only a small subset of users.
The scientists say: "The term TV addiction is imprecise and laden with value judgments, but it captures the essence of a very real phenomenon.
It developed standards that help reduce the temptation to produce studies with the greatest potential for abuse--namely, comparative studies involving value judgments about the relative importance of different environmental attributes.
Greg Gardner, said, "What we were looking at was not the autonomy of one person to have assisted suicide but the freedom of the majority to be protected from value judgments about the quality of life.
Instead, the author convincingly lays blame for the social and moral paralysis that characterizes and diminishes much of our current interpersonal activity on--among others--courts that overemphasize neutral process because they are afraid to make value judgments that reject outlandish arguments, self-serving governmental bureaucracies, and labor unions that perpetuate mediocrity.