Valuation

(redirected from valuational)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Valuation

Determination of the value of a company's stock based on earnings and the market value of assets.

Valuation

The process of determining how much an asset, company, or anything else is worth. Valuation is highly subjective, but it is easiest when one is considering the current value of tangible assets. For example, determining how much a willing buyer will pay a willing seller for a house right now is easier than determining the value of what a company's brand recognition might be in 10 years. Valuation is important in fundamental analysis, the practitioners of which usually consider a company's earnings to be indicative of its value.

valuation

A process for calculating the monetary value of an asset. Valuation is subjective and results in wide disparities for the values of most assets.

Valuation.

Valuation is the process of estimating the value, or worth, of an asset or investment.

Sometimes it means determining a fixed amount, such as establishing the value of your estate after your death. Other times, valuation means estimating future worth.

For example, fundamental stock analysts estimate the outlook for a company's stock by looking at data such as the stock's price-to-earnings (P/E), price-to-sales, and price-to-book (net asset value) ratios.

In general, a company with a high P/E is considered overvalued, and a company with a low P/E is considered undervalued.

valuation

(1) The process of estimating the worth of something. (2) The estimated worth given to something.

References in periodicals archive ?
And if we think ecologically then we recognise that we too are "loci of valuational activity, in the sense that we are points through which values get organized and synthesized" (113) and transformed.
But it also moves the axiological concept of relationality into the realm of metaphysics, by formulating the idea of individuality in terms of loci of valuational activity.
Morito blunts Smith's attack by explaining (again, accurately) that his book was never really designed to ground ethics in ecology but simply to offer ecology as an analogy to the kind of epistemology ethicists and others might find helpful in this era of partial truths and valuational relativism.
It provides the conditions of cosmic order, affects the possibility for specific achievement, and creates the conditions for continued achievement in the temporal progression and valuational enhancement of that order.
Also, "It is either false or senseless to deny that what valuational predicates stand for are properties in a world.
What is at stake in the articulation and defense of epistemological internalism, normative objectivism, valuational pluralism, qualified naturalism, and a host of other "-isms" is never made clear in Moral Knowledge and Ethical Character.
Understood in this valuational sense, Hardwick thinks one can affirm God's existence: "As a meta-assertion for a valuing stance (a seeing- and experiencing-as), `God exists' can be true because determined by physical fact" (p.
10) Genetic and cultural features may subtend them, but they are centered around the affective and valuational affinities of individuals.
Carter concludes that "enrichment of meaning is the result of valuational