Valuation

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Valuation

Determination of the value of a company's stock based on earnings and the market value of assets.

Valuation

The process of determining how much an asset, company, or anything else is worth. Valuation is highly subjective, but it is easiest when one is considering the current value of tangible assets. For example, determining how much a willing buyer will pay a willing seller for a house right now is easier than determining the value of what a company's brand recognition might be in 10 years. Valuation is important in fundamental analysis, the practitioners of which usually consider a company's earnings to be indicative of its value.

valuation

A process for calculating the monetary value of an asset. Valuation is subjective and results in wide disparities for the values of most assets.

Valuation.

Valuation is the process of estimating the value, or worth, of an asset or investment.

Sometimes it means determining a fixed amount, such as establishing the value of your estate after your death. Other times, valuation means estimating future worth.

For example, fundamental stock analysts estimate the outlook for a company's stock by looking at data such as the stock's price-to-earnings (P/E), price-to-sales, and price-to-book (net asset value) ratios.

In general, a company with a high P/E is considered overvalued, and a company with a low P/E is considered undervalued.

valuation

(1) The process of estimating the worth of something. (2) The estimated worth given to something.

References in periodicals archive ?
But the accommodation of a wholistic, normative social ontology within the positivist paradigm was then and has always remained problematic, owing to the fundamental ontological inadmissibility of logical and valuational relations for a conception of knowledge whose ultimate epistemological ground remains the perception of discrete material entities.
Hence ultimately Byron's mutual subversion of values is only destructive, his ideological warfare only annihilating, for idealistic systems are themselves mired in mundane life's valuational battles; and no overarching transcendent life-force can save them.
In the second and third parts of the work Hardwick develops his thesis by taking up the view that faith-claims express an existential self-understanding, by holding that when the Christian faith is so interpreted it makes `a valuational claim to meet the human quest for liberation and fulfillment' and by arguing that the resulting `existentially interpreted "valuational theism" is a seeing-as' for which normative status can justifiably be claimed.
The book is marred, though, by a silly hostility to what she terms |process' philosophy (by which I take her to mean philosophy done in the analytic tradition) and by a bizarre belief that most philosophers take the truth of valuational relativism for granted.
But what is most illuminating here is that these values have emerged, both naturally and culturally, from developments of the inherent valuational character of biosemiosis itself.
If these valuational methods produce approximately the same results, there would be no issue.
His book Thinking Ecologically: Environmental Thought, Values and Policy (Morito 2002) develops a sophisticated 'biocentric' approach to ecological evaluation that, although informed by a variety of Eastern and aboriginal traditions, focuses primarily on the valuational significance of evolutionary processes and ecosystemic relations.
Regardless of whether the selection is determined, the inquirer furthers inquiry through review and rearrangement of the phenomenological base, anchoring the inquiry's resolution in her or his sense of things underlying cognitive and valuational preferences; that is underlying her or his ways of paying attention in belief, assessment and action as inquiry brings forth a world.
They also explore how a reappropriated understanding of sacraments and sacramental experience in the light of postmodern problematics can address the valuational concerns behind the postmodern critique of modernity.
Option A is commensurable with option B if and only if there is a valuational measure of more and less, and some however complex property [Phi] that is correlative with choice and rationally antecedent to choice and rationally determinant of choice, such that A and B can be exhaustively compared by the said measure in respect of being more [Phi] and less [Phi]; where an exhaustive comparison in respect of [Phi]-ness is a comparison in respect of everything that matters about either A or B.
A fortiori, if one follows this argument and takes account of the historical and other research on economic exchange, there might have been certain tendencies for the central organizing basis of modern market processes to shift from that single principle of instrumental or formal economic rationality to normative, valuational, political, institutional, integrative, and other social factors expressing noninst rumental or substantive rationality.
Since Sardanapalus and Salemenes are both sympathetic, the lovingness of the ruler and the heroics of the adviser are both affirmed, regardless of valuational differences.