delivery

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Delivery

The tender and receipt of an actual commodity or financial instrument in settlement of a futures contract.

Delivery

The transfer of a security or an underlying asset to a buyer. The term is often used in options, forward, and futures contracts, in which payment and delivery are separated by a relatively long period of time. Most of the time, however, delivery does not occur, as most traders offset their positions with opposite contracts.

delivery

1. The transfer of a security to an investor's broker in order to satisfy an executed sell order. Delivery is required by the settlement date.
2. The transfer of a specified commodity in order to meet the requirements of a commodity contract that has been sold.

delivery

The transfer of possession from one person to another.Deeds and leases require delivery before they are effective. Delivery does not depend on manual transfer, but does depend on the intent of the parties. Deeds are delivered when placed within the possession or control of the grantee in such a manner that the grantor cannot regain possession or control.

References in periodicals archive ?
Operative vaginal delivery and neonatal and infant adverse outcomes: population-based retrospective analysis.
For example, maternal hemorrhage, which is one of the moderate quality evidence variables, is noted to be more frequent with a combination of planned vaginal delivery and unplanned cesarean delivery than with planned cesarean delivery.
Out of the 192 women who planned to get pregnant again, only 5% of women who had a vaginal delivery reported difficulty conceiving compared with 19% of those who had a Caesarean.
San Ramon Regional Medical Center, San Ramon - Caesarean Section, Colon Surgery and Vaginal Delivery
Data source: A cohort study of women who underwent vaginal delivery at 510 U.
Attempted vaginal delivery was compared to planned caesarean delivery.
We argue that even when a normal vaginal delivery is anticipated, the practitioner is obliged to discuss the alternative of CS with the woman.
Cesarean delivery on maternal request "may be a reasonable alternative" to planned vaginal delivery, after thorough discussion with the patient, the panel of 18 experts said in a draft state-of-the-science report.
1) The average blood loss for a vaginal delivery is approximately 500 mL, a calculation determined in an investigation using chromium-labeled red blood cells in 1962.
Experts list a number of reasons for the rising Caesarean rate, including fear of malpractice suits and the reluctance by doctors to use forceps or vacuum extraction if vaginal delivery fails.
The woman had been born via a normal vaginal delivery without the use of forceps, and she had no congenital disorders.
Now, roughly 60 percent of women in the United States whose first baby is born by cesarean shun that route the second time, opting instead to go into labor to attempt a vaginal delivery.