Usury

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Usury

This term is generally used to denote an illegal predatory lending practice in which a lender charges an interest rate on a loan that is considered to be excessive or in violation with interest rate limits as established by some state governments. An excessively high interest rate that is overly burdensome for the borrower. A lender may set an interest rate unreasonably high if they believe that the borrower may not be able to repay the loan and interest. Limits on interest rates vary from state to state within the U.S. See: Loan shark, Usury laws

Usury

An excessively high interest rate. Different jurisdictions have different regulations as to what constitutes usury, but most places have laws protecting consumers from the practice of borrowing at such an interest rate. In some cases, as in Islamic finance, any interest at all is considered to be usury, and, therefore, providers of funding must find different ways to provide financing at a profit.

usury

An interest rate higher than allowed by state law. The limits usually vary depending on the size of the loan,the term,the use of the money,and/or the status of the borrower as a consumer or other type of borrower. The consequences of usury may range from a reduction of the interest rate, loss of all interest completely, or even civil fines or penalties.

References in periodicals archive ?
4) Again: "You, usurer, grow wealthy by other people's heaviness; you make gains from their tears and weeping; you are fed with their hunger; you make your money from the skins of those people whom you destroy; how can you think yourself to be rich, and yet beg alms from him who is poor?
The canto equates the Jews with usurers and catalogues the pernicious effects of usury in Western culture, carrying strong fascist and anti-Semitic tendencies throughout.
Even in today's Webster, the lexicon incorporates Jewish literary stereotypes as common nouns, namely, shylock, fagin and (S)vengali as usurers, child molesters, and personal manipulators.
Among those whose transgression was against art (that is, human productivity), the usurers appear like beasts, their snouts weighed down by pouches bearing the insignia of their family banking houses:
A Broadside Against Coffee notes mixing of "the clean and the unclean" and The Character of A Coffeehouse represents patrons as usurer, gallant, virtuoso, player, and country clown.
ALONG WITH THE CHRIST-KILLER image was the stereotype of the Jew as bloodsucking usurer.
shat out the great usurer Satan-Geryon/prototype of Churchill's bosses").
The Usurer (Onzeneiro) is similarly confident that his wealth will enable him to buy a place in the Angel's boat:
In CBDs the world over, Mammon has replaced God as the object of slavering, unquestioning veneration, business bureaucrats have superseded popes as the great patrons of art and architecture (underlining the Church's loss of its historical wealth, status and power) and shopping is the new religion (although there have always been ways to buy your place in heaven -- Giotto's exquisite, transcendent frescoes at the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua, for example, were commissioned by Enrico Scrovegni, son of a notorious usurer Reginaldo, in attempted expiation of his father's sins.
48) The usury statute of Edward III in 1341 (49) gave the Church the authority to administer penalties during the life of the usurer, while the crown was given control over usury enforcement after the usurer's death.
Grith's A Corner in Wheat and The Usurer (1910) raised social problems in order to resolve those problems through an individualised act of heroism or fate.
Beethoven wrote: "I am not out to be a musical usurer as you think, who writes only to become rich, by no means