Organized Labor

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Related to union: European Union, Soviet Union

Organized Labor

A group of employees in a certain company or with a certain skill who unite in a single body for purposes of negotiating wages, benefits, working conditions, and other issues with management. Members of an organized labor group must ratify decisions made by their representatives with management. Proponents of organized labor argue that it creates better working environments and played a significant role in creating the middle class in many countries. Critics contend that it creates economic inefficiency and can drive companies out of business with employees' high demands. In the United States, organized labor is regulated by the National Labor Relations Board. An organized labor group is called a union. See also: Strike.
References in classic literature ?
They'll read and sing a sacred song, And make a prayer both loud and long, And teach the right and do the wrong, Hailing the brother, sister throng, With words of heavenly union.
We wonder how such saints can sing, Or praise the Lord upon the wing, Who roar, and scold, and whip, and sting, And to their slaves and mammon cling, In guilty conscience union.
I therefore consider that, in view of the Constitution and the laws, the Union is unbroken; and to the extent of my ability I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins upon me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all the States.
The mails, unless repelled, will continue to be furnished in all parts of the Union.
That we may form a juster estimate with regard to this interesting subject, let us resort to the actual dimensions of the Union.
A second observation to be made is that the immediate object of the federal Constitution is to secure the union of the thirteen primitive States, which we know to be practicable; and to add to them such other States as may arise in their own bosoms, or in their neighborhoods, which we cannot doubt to be equally practicable.
Although Defoe did all he could to bring the Union about he felt for and with the poor distracted people.
In pursuance of the plan which I have laid down for the discussion of the subject, the point next in order to be examined is the "insufficiency of the present Confederation to the preservation of the Union.
From the first, the Western Union relied more upon its strength than upon the merits of its case.
Still continuing no less attached to union than enamored of liberty, they observed the danger which immediately threatened the former and more remotely the latter; and being pursuaded that ample security for both could only be found in a national government more wisely framed, they as with one voice, convened the late convention at Philadelphia, to take that important subject under consideration.
He had somehow taken it for granted that he should go out with his union.
In these unions more favorable conditions will continue to prevail.