trustor


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Trustor

One who gives money and/or other assets to a trust. A trustor usually sets up a trust in order to provide for the financial future of a minor child or mentally incompetent person. A trustor may also set up a trust to benefit a charitable organization. It is important to note that the trustor does not hold or invest the assets once they are given to the trust, as that is the duty of the trustee. See also: Escrow, Charitable trust.

trustor

The person or organization that creates a trust.
References in periodicals archive ?
physical), the time that a trustor takes to develop online trust is shorter than the time it takes to develop trust in the face-to-face environment.
A trustor used to be able to simply select a professional trustee based on a business or personal banking relationship and not worry about trustee succession by assuming the institutional trustee would be around for years to come.
State laws in Nevada are very favorable for trustors, to the point that trusts there now hold $18 billion in assets, up from $8 billion in 2008.
Nevertheless, this model has four limitations as follows: a) The similarity weight is only derived from the distance of rating values, so if the trustor has no previous interaction with the trustee, the similarity weight is set to a default low value due to the absence of the rating value.
However, his use of Gencor and Trustor as illustrations of the concealment principle suggest that the proper focus of the analysis is entirely on the manner in which assets are received by the recipient.
Marsh and Dibben (2005) suggest that the fundamental difference between the two is that the former is deliberate whereas the latter is unintentional, and they are both a function of the reasons the trustor attributes to the trustee's negative behavior (Tomlinson & Mayer, 2009).
They explained trustworthiness as the characteristics of the tustee based on which, a trustor will trust the trustee.
Several experimental studies of one-shot two-player trust games show that communication increases cooperation between trustor and trustee (Ben-Ner and Putterman 2009; BenNer, Putterman, and Ren 2011; Buchan, Croson, and Johnson 2006; Charness and Dufwenberg 2006; Glaeser et al.
It also imposed a duty upon those who received slaves under a will to free the slaves according to the request of the trustor.
As stated above, the trust concept involves two relationships which involve different trustors (the subject to trust) and trustees (the object to be trusted).
benevolence suggests that the trustee has some underlying attachment to the trustor such as the relationship between a mentor and a protege, which is likely to increase over time as the relationship grows stronger.
The model distinguishes trust and its antecedents, based on the assumption that the trustor agrees to be vulnerable to the trustee, based on willingness to trust and on the perception that the other party deserves to be trusted.