trust

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Trust

A fiduciary relationship calling for a trustee to hold the title to assets for the benefit of the beneficiary. The person creating the trust, who may or may not also be the beneficiary, is called the grantor.

Trust

1. A relationship in which one party, known as the trustor, gives to a person or organization, known as the trustee, the right to hold and invest assets or property on behalf of a third party, known as the beneficiary. Most trusts exist to provide for the financial future of a minor child or mentally incompetent person. Trusts may also be set up to benefit charitable organizations. The trust agreement indicates at what time, if any, the beneficiary takes direct control of the assets. The beneficiary often receives disbursements to meet basic expenses until the time comes when the beneficiary takes control. Trusts are taxed on all money not given to the beneficiary. See also: Escrow, Charitable trust.

2. See: Monopoly.

trust

A legal arrangement whereby control over property is transferred to a person or organization (the trustee) for the benefit of someone else (the beneficiary). Trusts are created for a variety of reasons, including tax savings and improved asset management. See also charitable lead trust, charitable remainder trust, Clifford trust, marital-deduction trust, QTIP trust.

Trust.

When you create a trust, you transfer money or other assets to the trust.

You give up ownership of those assets in order to accomplish a specific financial goal or goals, such as protecting assets from estate taxes, simplifying the transfer of property, or making provision for a minor or other dependents.

When you establish the trust, you are the grantor, and the people or institutions you name to receive the trust assets at some point in the future are known as beneficiaries. You also designate a trustee or trustees, whose job is to manage the assets in the trust and distribute them according to the instructions you provide in the trust document.

trust

  1. a collection of ASSETS held and managed by appointed trustees on behalf of an individual or group of people. Trusts are often established to minimize the amount of INCOME TAX and WEALTH TAX an individual or group is required to pay. See TRUSTEE INVESTMENTS.
  2. see UNIT TRUST.
  3. an alternative term for a CARTEL (most commonly used in the USA).

trust

  1. ASSETS held and managed by trustees on behalf of an individual or group. While these assets are held in trust, the beneficiaries have no control over the management of them. In the UK, trusts have been used extensively to minimize the effects of income and wealth taxes.
  2. (formerly, in the USA) a means of organizing CARTELS, provoking the establishment of anti-trust (anti-monopoly) legislation.

trust

The practice of one party holding legal title to real property or other assets for the benefit of someone else,called the beneficiary.The one with the legal title is called the trustee.The person or entity that set up the trust is called the trustor.Trusts are extremely important in tax and estate planning but should almost never be established without the assistance of a tax attorney who is well skilled in the area. A very slight deviation from the format acceptable to the IRS could prove disastrous.

Trust

A tax entity created by a trust agreement. This entity distributes all or part of its income to beneficiaries as instructed by the trust agreement. This entity is required to pay taxes on undistributed income
References in periodicals archive ?
Trust is "the willingness of a party to be vulnerable to the actions of another party based on the expectation that the other will perform a particular action important to the truster, irrespective of the ability to monitor or control that other party" (Mayer, Davis, and Schoorman 1995) or, more succinctly, "accepted vulnerability to another's possible but not expected ill will (or lack of good will)" (Baier 1986).
Kamen, by the way; also reports that doubts as to who would be formulating national security policy inside an Al Gore White House seemed removed last month when Gore's brain truster Leon Fuerth announced himself to 300 members of the Council on Foreign Relations as the "putative national security adviser.
For the sake of brevity, I offer the following definition of trust, but will not argue for it here: [6] Trust is a disposition on the part of one person (the trusting party) to extend to another (the trusted party) discretionary power over something the truster values (the "object of trust") with the confident expectation that the trusted party will have the good will and competence to successfully care for it.
The company also publishes and distributes Truster (your personal truth verifier for the PC), Express Assist (the easy way to make backups of your Outlook Express e-mail and newsgroups), OutBack (the quick way to back up your Outlook contact folders), and Amigo (the smart information manager).
The Truster - made by a firm in Israel - can be hooked up to a computer and a telephone.
One of the Company's recent customers, Truster USA, will be the focal point of an upcoming program on FOX Television.
He was beloved in Ireland, where he was a truster in peace amid the political turmoils of his time.
Le succes du Montenegro va probablement satisfaire bien des nations europeennes, lassees de voir la Norvege truster les podiums continentaux et internationaux depuis une decennie.
at 138 ("To trust is to let another think about and take action to protect and advance something the truster cares about, to let the trusted care for what one cares about.
Paul Truster, "Brian Dickson Down the Middle" Law Times (15 December 2003) 8; Kirk Makin, "The Judge and the Juror" The Globe and Mail (3 January 2004) D8; Roland Penner, "Defender of the Charter" Literary, Review of Canada 12:4 (May 2004) 25; Jamie Cameron, "Dickson's Law: 'Manifestly One of the Humanities'" (2005) 54 U.
Of more immediate domestic interest could be a neat little device called The Truster (pounds 35, pcworld.