Trilateral Commission

(redirected from trilateralism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to trilateralism: postmodernism

Trilateral Commission

An informal group of 300 to 400 people from North America, Europe, and East Asia who meet several times a year to discuss public policy with an eye toward promoting globalization and integration. Membership is by invitation and current government officials are excluded from membership. However, many members go on to become high political executives. The Trilateral Commission has been controversial throughout its history, with some accusing it of promoting a one-world government. It was established in 1973 by David Rockefeller. See also: Council on Foreign Relations.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) The United States is pursuing strategic trilateralism with Japan and Australia, Japan and South Korea, and Japan and India.
The current structure of multilateralism is a classic liberal embedded multilateralism with the new trilateralism at its core.
The reluctance of the Conservative government to become too involved in municipal concerns might stimulate the FCM to complement its advocacy role by developing its capacity to "provide centralized information and policy research facilities" (Stevenson and Gilbert 2005: 534), as requested by its members in the survey taken when the FCM was at its lowest ebb following the demise of trilateralism as a constitutional option in the 1980s.
It is puzzling that the two countries with the largest trading relationship in the world and ones with vast ecological capabilities and interdependencies should have waited until the arrival of Mexico and the trilateralism it brought to forge their direct international institutional trade-environment link.