Base

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Related to transistor: diode, transistor characteristics

Base

A technical analysis tool. A chart pattern depicting the period when the supply and demand of a certain stock are in relative equilibrium, resulting in a narrow trading range. The merging of the support level and resistance level.

Base

In technical analysis, a situation in which the support level and the resistance level are roughly the same for a given (usually long) period of time. That is, a base occurs when a security trades only in a very narrow range. A base indicates that the supply and demand for a security are at an equilibrium. This means that the security is unlikely to be bullish or bearish in the near future.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under test conditions, typical silicon-based transistors such as those in Pentium microprocessors run at about 50 billion to 100 billion cycles per second, or gigahertz (GHz).
Just as aircraft were once believed incapable of breaking an imaginary 'sound barrier', silicon-based transistors were once thought incapable of breaking a 200GHz speed barrier," said Bernard Meyerson, IBM Fellow and vice president, IBM Communications Research and Development Center.
The result: a dense array of unharmed, working semiconducting nanotube transistors that can be used to build logic circuits like those found in computer chips.
Because of the conflicting effects that strain has on N-type and P-type transistors, this whole-wafer approach of building strain into silicon typically improves the performance of one transistor type more than that of the other.
Specifically, the increasing miniaturization causes greater variations in key transistor characteristics, especially the threshold voltage (Vth).
On the other hand, the new transistor simultaneously controls the electric power that drives a lamp and serves as the lamp itself.
RFMD's GaN HEMT transistors for the wireless cellular market are targeted to the UMTS or 3G base station segment and include the RF3820 (8W), RF3912 (60W), RF3913 (90W) and RF3914 (120W).
Lee and Vivek Subramanian of the University of California, Berkeley say that the perpendicular arrangement of a fabric's fibers should make it possible to wire transistors such as these new fiber ones into sensing devices, wearable displays, and other electronic devices.
Compared to today's 65nm transistors, integrated tri-gate transistors can offer a 45 percent increase in drive current (switching speed) or 50 times reduction in off-current, and 35 percent reduction in transistor switching power.
The first transistor, invented in 1947, was a centimeter-long slab of germanium pressed against the point of a triangle of plastic partly wrapped in gold foil.
Yoshimitsu Kobayashi, President and CEO of MCRC, stated: "This achievement is a superior milestone in the development of organic thin-film transistor technologies, because this demonstrates that OTFT can be applied to the flat panel displays which require high mobility, such as an OLED.
Now, using a novel method of making transistors, Jan Hendrik Schon and his colleagues at Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs in Murray Hill, N.