Base

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Related to transistor: diode, transistor characteristics

Base

A technical analysis tool. A chart pattern depicting the period when the supply and demand of a certain stock are in relative equilibrium, resulting in a narrow trading range. The merging of the support level and resistance level.

Base

In technical analysis, a situation in which the support level and the resistance level are roughly the same for a given (usually long) period of time. That is, a base occurs when a security trades only in a very narrow range. A base indicates that the supply and demand for a security are at an equilibrium. This means that the security is unlikely to be bullish or bearish in the near future.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original idea of field effect transistors dated back to the German scientist Julius Lilienfield in 1925 and a structure closely resembling the MOSFET was proposed in 1935 by Oskar Heil but materials problems foiled early attempts to make functioning devices.
The new transistors can be deposited on low cost flexible substrates such as PET and PEN film, aluminum or stainless steel foil.
Wernersson described the new nanowire transistors last month at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting in Washington, D.
Just a decade ago, the state-of-the-art process technology was 250nm, meaning transistor dimensions were approximately 5.
The transistor -- a type of electrical on/off switch -- is the key component of the integrated circuit, or microchip.
Akira Endoh of Fujitsu Laboratories in Atsugi, Japan, rates the advance as an important step toward the realization of the terahertz transistor.
The transistor uses a modified design and IBM's proven silicon germanium (SiGe) technology to reach speeds of 210 GigaHertz (GHz) while drawing just a milliamp of electrical current.
Adding to the 50nm design improvements, the SEG transistor introduces a multi-layered dielectric layer (ZrO2/Al2O3/ZrO2) to resolve weak electrical features.
In contrast, prototype transistors made from his team's new material are 10 times as conductive as the silicon transistors used in today's liquid-crystal displays.
IBM researchers have built the world's first array of transistors out of carbon nanotubes -- tiny cylinders of carbon atoms that measure as small as 10 atoms across and are 500 times smaller than today's silicon-based transistors.
The transistor contains no semiconductor materials and makes use of voltage-controlled quantum tunneling to determine the flow of electrons.
The transistor laser is "a major technology breakthrough in high-speed optoelectronics," comments K.