Toxin

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Toxin

Any poisonous substance a living thing produces as part of its metabolic or other natural process. That is, toxins themselves are not living things, but are produced by living things. Toxins are defined by the Biological Weapons Convention.
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This is the first clinical study of test products and it shows an average reduction in smokers' exposure to certain toxicants over the study period.
Diuron: 2,495 gallons; a suspected carcinogen, birth defects, blood toxicant
The cells proved exquisitely sensitive to minute levels of the toxicants, and the researchers found a previously unknown mechanism by which these agents cause the effects.
While this can offer individuals--from fashion-conscious teens to professional manicurists--a big slug of the toxicant, nail treatments coat small areas and the exposures are short-lived.
In addition to a focus on primary stressors, applicants should investigate the effects of secondary modifiers such as co-morbid disease/conditions, aging, diet, infectious disease, and/or idiosyncratic drug reactions that have the possibility to influence the susceptibility to physical or environmental toxicant exposures and thereby alter disease processes.
Dioxinlike toxicants sabotaged these efforts to reintroduce a self-sustaining population of the fish, Cook and Peterson argue in several studies to be published later this year.
Eventually, the genetic profiles of organism responses to toxicants will be collected into a toxicogenomics database that will be publicly available to the scientific community for their research.
Some of the NIEHS disaster response efforts are unique programs that will help identify the environmental hazards produced by Katrina as well as provide long-term insights into the link between environmental toxicants and health outcomes.
Suggested topics and example research projects include, but are not limited to, first, integration of basic mechanism-driven and clinical patient-oriented research to gain new insights into the role of environmental factors in complex human diseases: 1) integration of patient phenotype data with high data content techniques such as transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to investigate the mechanisms by which exposures lead to disease; 2) comparison of animal/model organism and human responses to toxicants to identify biological alterations contributing to the disease etiology; 3) examination of the impact of current and/or prior environmental exposures on the progression, treatment, and survival of patients with existing disease.
Though the pups' TCDD exposure undoubtedly began in utero, notes Dick Peterson, who led the three Wisconsin studies, earlier data indicate a pregnant animal will eliminate most of the fat-seeking toxicant through breast milk.
He introduces the principles of toxicology at the molecular, cellular, and organism levels, and the most important food-borne toxicants, such as endogenous plant toxicants; geochemical pollutants that plants absorb from the soil; environmental pollutants; mycotoxins; animal endogenous poisons; toxicants from aquatic animals; pesticide residues; veterinary drugs and feed additives; toxicants formed during processing, storage, and digestion; food additives; and vitamins.
Over 2,700 new citations identify previously unknown toxicants and provide all the technical details, while information on plant morphology and disease clinical signs brings together a range of ideas and approaches blending information sources for small and exotic animal practices.