capital

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Capital

Capital

Money that one has invested. For example, one uses capital when building a factory to make a new product. Likewise, one uses capital when one buys a single share of a stock. Free flow of capital into investments is thought to be a major component of economic growth. Generally speaking, businesses can only expand when they are able to raise capital from investors or borrow it from a bank or through a bond issue. See also: Capitalization, Capitalism.

Capital.

Capital is money that is used to generate income or make an investment. For example, the money you use to buy shares of a mutual fund is capital that you're investing in the fund.

Companies raise capital from investors by selling stocks and bonds and use the money to expand, make acquisitions, or otherwise build the business.

The term capital markets refers to the physical and electronic environments where this capital is raised, either through public offerings or private placements.

capital

  1. the funds invested in a BUSINESS in order to acquire the ASSETS which the business needs to trade. Capital can consist of SHARE CAPITAL subscribed by SHAREHOLDERS or LOAN CAPITAL provided by lenders.
  2. GOODS such as plant, machinery and equipment which are used to produce other goods and services. See CAPITAL STOCK, INVESTMENT.

capital

the contribution to productive activity made by INVESTMENT in physical capital (for example, factories, offices, machinery, tools) and in HUMAN CAPITAL (for example, general education, vocational training). Capital is one of the three main FACTORS OF PRODUCTION, the other two being LABOUR and NATURAL RESOURCES. Physical (and human) capital make a significant contribution towards ECONOMIC GROWTH. See CAPITAL FORMATION, CAPITAL STOCK, CAPITAL WIDENING, CAPITAL DEEPENING, GROSS FIXED CAPITAL FORMATION, CAPITAL ACCUMULATION.

capital

(1) In architecture, the top part of a column.(2) In finance: (a) All the accumulated goods, possessions, and assets used for the production of income and wealth. (b) The amount invested in business.
References in classic literature ?
With a shiver of dread the boy arose and went along the road toward town.
Just think, Ma--there's never been one in this town, and everybody will be dying to see them, and they're all OURS
You cannot go to town till tomorrow, Brandon, that is all.
But the dogs and the cats and the children still ran up and followed him through the town --the same as they had done when he was rich.
The men of the troop stood their ground till night, and as the enemy did not come out to battle, they returned to their town exulting; and had they been aware of the ancient custom of the Greeks, they would have erected a trophy on the spot.
Her mother was sitting by the fireside spinning her purple yarn with her maids around her, and she happened to catch her father just as he was going out to attend a meeting of the town council, which the Phaeacian aldermen had convened.
Sentinels likewise were posted at the lodgings of the officers in many parts of the town.
The waves have now a redder glow - The hours are breathing faint and low - And when, amid no earthly moans, Down, down that town shall settle hence, Hell, rising from a thousand thrones, Shall do it reverence.
He therefore advanced toward the east, and reached the town of Zouricolo, in the Bornou country, which is the core of the great central empire of Africa.
As we have just said, each of these three great divisions of Paris was a town, but too special a town to be complete, a city which could not get along without the other two.
At this there was bustling at the Sheriff's castle, and men ran hither and thither upon this business and upon that, while the forge fires of Nottingham glowed red far into the night like twinkling stars, for all the smiths of the town were busy making or mending armor for the Sheriff's troop of escort.
One night in the chapel, after the usual chapel exercises were over, General Armstrong referred to the fact that he had received a letter from some gentlemen in Alabama asking him to recommend some one to take charge of what was to be a normal school for the coloured people in the little town of Tuskegee in that state.