Tombstone

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Tombstone

Advertisement listing the underwriters of a security issue.

Tombstone

An advertisement detailing a new issue of a security. Most importantly, the tombstone lists the underwriting syndicate responsible for placing the new issue with investors. Tombstones list the syndicate according to bracket, which is a place on a hierarchy indicating how much of an issue each individual underwriter is placing with respect to the others. The brackets are called, from largest to smallest: bulge bracket, major bracket, minor bracket, underwriter, and selling group. A tombstone derives its name because, in print, it looks vaguely like a stereotypical tombstone from the Old West.

tombstone

An advertisement for a securities issue. The ad lists the security, some of the security's specifics, and a bracketed list of the members of the syndicate selling the issue in the order of the members' importance. The term derives from the fact that the notice appears as a matter of record after the sale has been completed.
References in periodicals archive ?
CAIRO: Egypt said yesterday it would restrict the number of visitors to the tomb of the boy pharaoh Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings to 400 a day from next month.
The complete Valley of the Kings; tombs and treasures of Egypt's greatest pharaohs.
As one of the most successful games of all time, selling over seven million copies worldwide, the original Tomb Raider was widely credited for revolutionizing adventure gaming.
Also included in this chapter is a full description of how a tomb was equipped for the dead king's life in the Netherworld or Afterlife.
These appendixes are followed by indexes of personal names, tomb numbers, and general terms that enable the reader to dip into the book for specific monuments.
That changed when a surprised team of archaeologists from the University of Memphis (Tennessee) stumbled upon an intact (untouched) tomb just 16 feet away from Tut's.
US archaeologists said they discovered the tomb by accident while working on a nearby site.
Eighty-three years after its discovery and 27 years after its first appearance in Los Angeles, King Tut's tomb hasn't lost its hold on people's imaginations.
Decades later, shortly before his death in 2003 at the age of ninety-five, he wrote A Tomb in Seville.
They sent me to the tomb with Ester, Ken's mother, who, like Mary in the face of death and the power of grief and loss, had wept, turned, and announced the resurrection.
Today, it is a crowded metropolis of tombs and monuments with not one free plot to be had: Descendants are reduced to fierce battles over who has the right to be buried in the family tomb or which ancestors are ripe for cremation; while the recently arrived who wish to start modern-day dynasties of their own must buy someone else's tomb--one can always be had from families in eclipse--and throw its former residents out.