Title

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Related to titled: tiled, entitled

Title

1. The right of ownership over a piece of tangible or intangible property. In countries and economic systems recognizing private ownership, title represents a recognition by government and society that a person or organization owns something.

2. A certificate acknowledging title. See also: Stockholder of record.

Title.

A title is a legal document proving ownership of a piece of property.

If you are buying real estate you authorize a title search, or examination of property records, to insure that the seller holds the title and has the right to transfer it.

In most cases, if you're taking a mortgage to buy the property, the lender will require you to arrange title insurance to protect its interest until the full amount of the loan has been repaid. You may also arrange for your own title insurance to protect you from losing your property if your ownership is successfully contested.

title

(1) All the elements that create the highest legal right to own,possess,use,control,enjoy,and dispose of real property or an inheritable right or interest in it.(2) The rights of ownership recognized and protected by the law.

References in classic literature ?
Montague's stories are silly and not true to life, so that is no argument," retorted Felicity, who knew more about cooking than about history, and evidently imagined that the Lady Jane Gray was one of Valeria's titled heroines.
But Sir Mulberry Hawk and Lord Verisopht were peremptory in their politeness, and leaving Ralph, who seemed to think, not unwisely, that he looked less ridiculous as a mere spectator, than he would have done if he had taken any part in these proceedings, they quitted the house with Mrs Nickleby between them; that good lady in a perfect ecstasy of satisfaction, no less with the attentions shown her by two titled gentlemen, than with the conviction that Kate might now pick and choose, at least between two large fortunes, and most unexceptionable husbands.
On the other hand his violent contempt for social and religious hypocrisy had as much of personal bitterness as of disinterested principle; and his persistent quest of notoriety, the absence of moderation in his attacks on religious and moral standards, his lack of self-control, and his indulgence in all the vices of the worser part of the titled and wealthy class require no comment.