Tithe

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Tithe

Ten percent of one's income or production donated to a religious institution. Historically, one could pay a tithe in cash or in kind. In a few jurisdictions, tithes are enforced by law. More broadly, a tithe may refer to a religious donation, even if it is less than 10% of one's income.
References in periodicals archive ?
The National Library of Wales and the Farmers' Union Wales are displaying a number of tithe maps at the pavilion.
The tithe maps, as they are known, were drawn up after the Tithe Commutation Act of 1836, and predate the large-scale Ordnance Survey maps which had not yet begun in Wales.
The commitment to stewardship brought the parish together to tithe 10% of its weekly income to various situations, persons, agencies, and those in need.
The] 'First-Fruit and Tithes' book was written for the primary purpose of clarifying first-fruit and tithes according to the Scriptures," states the author.
Originally, tithes were paid to the church but as time went on some were sold, often to secure even more wealth for the great monasteries that flourished in the countryside.
He said the extent of liability depended upon whether it was based on a right to tithes, or land that was formerly owned by the rector.
His great great great grandfather, Sir Henry Osborne, can be found in the Tithe Applotment Books, living in County Tipperary in 1824.
The Fiqh academy, a centre of research on Islamic jurisprudence, said that Islamic scholars had ruled that it is acceptable to direct one's tithes to other communities and countries than one's own.
According to Numbers 18:20-32, all tithes were to go to the Levites, the second-rank clergy who carried out their ministries in connection with the tabernacle and later the temple.
In the Bible, there are many different tithes described.
Legend has it that, upon the saint's words, the dead man walked to stand outside the gates of the churchyard until the service had ended, and explained he had been excommunicated for failing to pay his tithes.
The established churches did not rely solely on funding from tithes and similar compulsory contributions.