tight money

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Tight money

When a restricted money supply makes credit difficult to secure. The antithesis of tight money is easy money.

Tight Money

A situation in which it is difficult to receive credit because of the monetary policy of the central bank. Tight money occurs when the central bank has enacted relatively high target interest rates. While this usually happens when the central bank is seeking to control or is concerned about inflation, tight money can negatively impact security prices and make it hard to receive a loan for a house or business.

tight money

A condition of the money supply in which credit is restricted and interest rates, consequently, are relatively high. Tight money generally has a negative effect on security prices, at least in the short run. Compare easy money.

tight money

or

dear money

a government policy whereby the CENTRAL BANK is authorized to sell government BONDS on the open market to facilitate a decrease in t he MONEY SUPPLY (see MONETARY POLICY).

The decrease in money supply serves to increase INTEREST RATES, which discourages INVESTMENT because previously profitable investments become unprofitable owing to the increased cost of borrowing (see MARGINAL EFFICIENCY OF CAPITAL

INVESTMENT).

Tight money policy, through MONEY SUPPLY/SPENDING LINKAGES, reduces AGGREGATE DEMAND. Contrast CHEAP MONEY.

References in classic literature ?
Let it want what it may," replied Don Quixote, "it shall not be said of me now or at any time that tears or entreaties turned me aside from doing what was in accordance with knightly usage; and so I beg of thee, Sancho, to hold thy peace, for God, who has put it into my heart to undertake now this so unexampled and terrible adventure, will take care to watch over my safety and console thy sorrow; what thou hast to do is to tighten Rocinante's girths well, and wait here, for I shall come back shortly, alive or dead.
Presently the beast dropped to the earth again and Tarzan came quickly to seize the rope, but Sabor had now found that it was only a slender cord that held her, and grasping it in her huge jaws severed it before Tarzan could tighten the strangling noose a second time.
Amid renewed growling and another futile attempt to free himself, Numa was finally forced to submit to the further indignity of having a rope secured about his neck; but this time it was no noose that might tighten and strangle him; but a bowline knot, which does not tighten or slip under strain.