Tide

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Related to tides: neap tides, spring tides

Tide

In technical analysis, an informal term for a security's performance over a long period of time, usually over a year or more. Analysts look for cyclical behavior in a security to interpret the tide properly; that is, if a long-term bull market is observed with a bad trading day in a certain week, an analyst might view the short-term trend as moderately bearish without detracting from the long-term bullish tide. The term was coined by Robert Rhea. See also: Ripple, Wave.
References in classic literature ?
Finally we had the satisfaction of seeing the vessel rise out of the mud and float slowly upstream with the tide.
We rigged up a single short mast and light sail, fastened planking down over the ballast to form a deck, worked her out into midstream with a couple of sweeps, and dropped our primitive stone anchor to await the turn of the tide that would bear us out to sea.
The girl pulled the hood of a cloak she wore, over her head and over her face, and, looking backward so that the front folds of this hood were turned down the river, kept the boat in that direction going before the tide.
The very basket that you slept in, the tide washed ashore.
The rising tide had flowed through the hole, and just awakened Nelson by getting into his bunk with him.
I'm afraid we shan't get round the point this tide, unless we lay her off on the other tack.
I must send ashore to the post-office, whether we lose the tide or not.
What it was I had no guess, which for the time increased my fear of it; but I now know it must have been the roost or tide race, which had carried me away so fast and tumbled me about so cruelly, and at last, as if tired of that play, had flung out me and the spare yard upon its landward margin.
One flood tide she found the water covered with muskmelons.
While I was doing this, I found the tide begin to flow, though very calm; and I had the mortification to see my coat, shirt, and waistcoat, which I had left on the shore, upon the sand, swim away.
If you have any regard for your life and the lives of all your men, put to sea without fail at high-water; and as you have a whole tide before you, you will be gone too far out before they can come down; for they will come away at high-water, and as they have twenty miles to come, you will get near two hours of them by the difference of the tide, not reckoning the length of the way: besides, as they are only boats, and not ships, they will not venture to follow you far out to sea, especially if it blows.
On this mighty tide the black ships--laden with the fresh-scented fir-planks, with rounded sacks of oil-bearing seed, or with the dark glitter of coal--are borne along to the town of St.