tenure

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tenure

A time period,as in the tenure of a lease.

References in classic literature ?
The tenure by which the judges are to hold their places, is, as it unquestionably ought to be, that of good behavior.
Here and there on the coasts, living by most precarious tenure, was a sprinkling of missionaries, traders, bˆche-de-mer fishers, and whaleship deserters.
Even the sick chamber seemed to be retained, on the uncertain tenure of Mr Quilp's favour.
Notwithstanding my inability to settle to anything - which I hope arose out of the restless and incomplete tenure on which I held my means - I had a taste for reading, and read regularly so many hours a day.
NS) has reduced its marginal cost of funds based lending rate (MCLR) by five basis points across all tenures effective September 1, 2017, The Business Line has reported, citing a statement from the bank.
Let this be a wake-up call for business leaders: Employees with the longest tenures in your company are also the least likely to be engaged.
It has kept interest rates unchanged for all other tenures.
an assessment of whether tenure security is an impediment to attracting working capital and investment, and a specific assessment of the 'bankability' of aboriginal tenures
Sources told M AIL T ODAY that most of the judges refuse to accept the offer as the tenure is too short and they prefer assignments which have longer tenures.
Smaller tenures attracts higher interest rates within the range.
During the same period, the oldest women--who already had longer tenures than men in their age group--have made even greater relative gains.
Judges, by contrast, do not have fixed tenures, but rather