tenure


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tenure

A time period,as in the tenure of a lease.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Water for Food land tenure project brings that objective within reach, especially in places such as the Kimberley and the Pilbara," Ms Davies said.
He accepted tenure early in his career as an information technology professor, but said he always felt uncomfortable with it.
The effect is pronounced even in employees with less than two years' tenure -- perhaps because higher engagement makes them more likely to interpret and use their early experiences productively.
First of all, whether or not one believes that college professors need the protection of tenure to secure their freedom of professional inquiry from censorship or punishment by academic administrators, this rationale has no applicability to public school teachers, who are hired to teach their subjects, not to engage in research or pursue political causes.
According to a recent study, the value of companies rises as the average tenure of outside board members increases to nine years, after which company value begins to decline [S.
Along with an increase in tenure, there have also been modest gains for female CFOs.
However,whatI know is that the party offices tenure has already been extended.
The first option is to increase the tenure from two years to either three or five years.
USAID defines its objective under STARR as, "address[ing] resource tenure issues in support of key U.
Second, teacher tenure has become the poster child for a larger attack on public employee unions.
Three years ago, when I started a book about the institution of tenure, I made a promise to myself: I would severely limit my use of the words "Ward" and "Churchill.
You have asked about the tenure hurdles at your new college or university, and you understand that the requirements are the same for all faculty in language and literature fields at your institution.