Tenement

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Tenement

An apartment building, especially a shoddy or poorly maintained one. A tenement may only meet the minimum standards for the owner to rent its units legally.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Progressives and the Slums: Tenement House Reform in New York City, 1890-1917.
In 1901, the landmark Tenement House Act was passed: Nestled within a thicket of new restrictions on tenement construction were new limits on residential building heights for virtually all multiunit residential buildings in Greater New York City.
On Veiller, see Roy Lubove, The Progressives and the Slums: Tenement House Reform in New York City, 1890-1917 (Pittsburgh, Pa.
Kept under a bell jar since 1965, the day Agnes Toward moved out, the Tenement House is a veritable picture book of life in 20th century Glasgow.
It was that upbringing in the two-room and kitchen tenement house that prepared Ferguson to meet all life's challenges.
I THINK of Warsaw and the world much before the war and step onto the cobblestone pathways of the 14th century Old Town where moneyed merchants built the colourful narrow- fronted tenement houses, where the Royal Castle looks oh
The State Statistics Committee of Uzbekistan plans to carry out selective poll among the citizens, who live in individual houses and tenement houses from 20 to 30 August.
The Market Bar was an abattoir, I believe, and Fade Street used to be an old sausage factory but other than that it was all tenement houses and there were great shots of them.
For example, after reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith, readers can access papers analyzing the different characters in the book, a doctorate paper on tenement houses in Brooklyn, and even a study guide for the book.
But she recalled how the community was split up some years later when all the old tenement houses were torn down.
Their dwelling would have been similar to the three tenement houses the collapse of which is reported here, a grim forerunner of the notorious Church Street collapse of September 1913, which heralded a major inquiry into housing conditions in the city.
Grossly overcrowded tenement houses were breeding grounds of hardship, hunger and disease.