telephone booth

(redirected from telephone)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to telephone: telephone service

Telephone Booth

Informal; a cubicle containing a telephone on the New York Stock Exchange. Member firms use these telephones to take orders for trade, which are then executed on the trading floor. Members then use the telephone booth to communicate the trade back to a client. With the advent of Blackberries and other personal digital devices, some members have begun using these instead of the telephone booths.

telephone booth

One of several telephone-containing cubicles located around the perimeter of the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Telephones in these booths are used by member firms to receive orders that are to be executed on the floor. Once the orders have been executed, the telephones are used to transmit information back to the members' offices.
References in classic literature ?
Hubbard--to become Bell's chief spokesman and defender, a true apostle of the telephone.
It was one of the most extraordinary incidents in the whole history of the telephone.
In a flash the conception of a membrane telephone was pictured in his mind.
Across the room from him Tarzan saw Olga seated before a little desk on which stood her telephone.
At that instant, just as I took a step backwards from the telephone, the thing was on us.
By nine o'clock his telephone began to ring and the reports to come in.
Quite irrelevantly, still at the telephone and talking with her, he felt an overpowering desire to die for her, and visions of heroic sacrifice shaped and dissolved in his whirling brain.
Fentolin, with your wireless telegraphy, and your telegraph office in the house, and telephones.
You know a telephone card, I suppose, when you see one
Yet she, Pollyanna, was expected to enter alone these fearsome rooms, and telephone the, doctor that the master of the house lay now--
The room was large, and sombre with dark woods and hangings like the hall; but through the west window the sun threw a long shaft of gold across the floor, gleamed dully on the tarnished brass andirons in the fireplace, and touched the nickel of the telephone on the great desk in the middle of the room.
Saxon talked with the lineman, following him about, till one o'clock, when he looked at his watch, said good bye, and returned to his task of putting in a telephone for the latest immigrant from the Azores.