Hacker

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Related to technophile: technophilia

Hacker

A person who infiltrates a computer system, usually in order to gather information. A hacker finds a way past the system's protocols. Some hackers do this simply for the thrill, though many others hack for nefarious purposes. For example, a hacker may be hired by a company or government to conduct espionage on a competitor or enemy. Other hackers freelance in order to find things like credit card numbers to facilitate identity theft and other crimes. However, the word is not always used in a negative context.
References in periodicals archive ?
15 000 one-time visitors each day, from the technophile to the jet-setter, to professionals with significant purchasing power, connect to look for the information riche about GSM news (84% consider the information to be really interesting) on a user-friendly and avant-gardist website (88.
It also surprised technophiles with a virtual reality headset, the Samsung VR.
Consumers all around the world, even technophiles, are using iTwin.
However, its ease of use and portability quickly made it a must-have device for technophiles, and it soon spawned imitators from other companies.
Leading Edge" (11% of online users) are technophiles.
The queues of technophiles snaked down Regent Street in central London from Thursday afternoon for the touch-screen tablet-style computer.
Despite Apple s wizardry with creations embraced by mainstream culture as well as technophiles, it could be tilting against windmills by releasing a tablet computer.
TECHNOPHILES who want the latest gadgets for Christmas won't use them nearly as much as they think, a scientific study has shown.
Technophiles can head to Geek Squad Counter Intelligence section for one-to-one advice and immediate solutions on any technical issue.
The technophiles pit the Sony PS3 against the Nintendo Wii, compare Freeview personal video recorders and look at a revolutionary speedboat.
Bush and the curtailments on civil liberties that have accompanied his "War on Terror," he examines and critiques the rise of big government conservatism, finding it to be an admixture of neoconservatism, national greatness conservatism, the religious right, supply-side economics, technophiles exemplified by Newt Gingrich.
It is not difficult to imagine, 10 or 20 years down the road, that technophiles will have taken the place of religious conservatives, protesting against the murder of a "temporarily unoccupied" body (not dead, please--that ugly old word just sounds so final) in the expectation that cures may be just a couple of years, months, or weeks away.