Tangibility

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Related to tangible: Tangible net worth

Tangibility

Characteristic that an assets can be used as collateral to secure debt.

Tangibility

In law, the ability to be apprehended by the human senses. Many assets have tangibility, including but not limited to, cash, commodities, real estate, and personal property. Some more abstract things also have tangibility, at least in certain circumstances. For example, accounts receivable is a tangible asset for accounting purposes. Tangibility explicitly does not include patents, brands, or intellectual property. An asset must have tangibility in order to be used as collateral on a loan. For example, one may not use a patent as collateral, but may use his/her house. See also: Intangibility, Tangible net worth.
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com)-- Tangible IP, LLC, an international patent brokerage and Intellectual Property advisory firm headquartered in Seattle, with offices in San Francisco and Montreal, announced today the sale of a patent portfolio pertaining to Amperometric Diagnostic Analysis technology belonging to Tall Oak Ventures, LLC (TOV).
For special educators and speech-language pathologists who work among adults with multiple disabilities, tangible object symbols may be an appropriate avenue for communication enhancement.
High-net-worth homeowners can sufficiently protect their wealth if they have access to a 360-degree view of their tangible assets.
In a bid to boost its cybersecurity solutions to federal and commercial markets, Tangible Software Inc.
M2 EQUITYBITES-September 13, 2012-Genesee & Wyoming commences public offering of its class A common and tangible equity units(C)2012 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.
BANKING AND CREDIT NEWS-May 8, 2012--RBC, Deutsche, JPMorgan bookrun Thompson Creek Metals tangible equity units sale(C)2012 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.
Brands, patents, goodwill, the knowledge of a firm's workforce and even its corporate strategy are all assets that aren't tangible but still add value.
and two-year old rapid-prototyping service bureau Tangible Express in Springville, Utah, has spawned a novel fractional-ownership program in manufacturing.
It requires a business purchaser (as opposed to simply a purchaser, under the original version) that is not a holder of a direct-pay permit and knows at the time of its purchase of a digital good, computer software or a service that it will be concurrently available for use in more than one jurisdiction, to deliver to the seller an "exemption certificate claiming MPU" While current SSUTA Section 312 requires delivery of an MPU exemption form only for computer software delivered electronically, the revised version also applies to computer software delivered by "load and leave" or in tangible form.
And when this visual, which contained so much more than words could express, finally began to make some sense to the girls, they made off with a visible and tangible piece of that world, which had the effect of proclaiming the faith that this man possessed as a boy, to the point where he had decided to return to the Church that very hour--a chain of events that a compost heap probably would not have initiated.
The proposed "tangibles regulations" published in the Federal Register on August 21, 2006 (1) largely refine and clarify rather than fundamentally change the decades-old criteria for distinguishing between deductible expenses incurred to repair and maintain tangible property and capitalized costs incurred to acquire, produce, or improve such property.
Quid pro quo sexual harassment is predicated upon a showing by employees that their response to unwelcome sexual advances was subsequently used as the basis for a tangible employment action.