Issue

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Issue

A particular financial asset.

Issue

A set of securities that a company or government offers for sale. That is, when a company sells stocks or bonds to the public (or offers them for private placement) the collection of stocks or bonds is said to be an issue. If the company or government is selling a set for the first time, it is said to be making a new issue. Typically, issues of securities may be bought and sold on the open market.

issue

A particular grouping of an organization's securities. For example, General Motors has a number of different issues of preferred stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

issue

To sell securities in the primary market. For example, in late 1996, Florida Panthers Holdings, Inc., owner of the NHL hockey team, issued 2,700,000 Class A shares of common stock at a price of $10 per share.

Issue.

When a corporation offers a stock or bond for sale, or a government offers a bond, the security is known as an issue, and the company or government is the issuer.

References in periodicals archive ?
He said that inaction or no action on their part is tantamount to giving a blank legislative check to anyone who takes issue with foundry industry positions.
Finally, Sharper Image takes issue with our May 2005 report on ozone generation.
Bill Allayaud, director of the state's Sierra Club chapter, takes issue with the CBIA claim that "rampant NIMBY lawsuits" filed under provisions of the environmental act have stalled development.
Your article takes issue with the finding by the League for Human Rights of B'nai Brith Canada that the controversy surrounding Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ was a contributing factor to the rise of anti-Semitism in this country last year.
Searle also takes issue with philosophical arguments that humans perceive not the real world but merely "sense data" Such claims, he contends, rely on slippery language and dubious assumptions.
FEI's Committee on Corporate Reporting (CCR) has issued a written comment to the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) on its proposal, An Audit of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting Performed in Conjunction with an Audit of Financial Statements, that takes issue with a perceived level of duplicative testing.
Harding, a psychiatrist at Boston University's Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation, takes issue with the film's portrayal of Nash's recovery as a unique phenomena (New York Times, March 11, 2002).
The American Health Care Association takes issue with the GAO's approach and its findings.
Lynn Staley, however, takes issue with the standard perception of The Book of Margery Kempe as the memoir of a religious eccentric.