Take Home Pay

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Take Home Pay

The paycheck actually issued to an employee after all withholding taxes are taken out. Examples of taxes withheld from an employee's pay are income taxes and FICA taxes. An employee must base his/her personal budget on take home pay and not on gross pay.
References in periodicals archive ?
In in , f hn low in th wv 2% How much more of their earnings people on [euro]70k get as take-home pay
David Yates, chief executive of VocaLink, said: "Although there was a big fall in inflation in September, overall take-home pay growth is slow, so there haven't been any notable gains.
Richardson first began boosting her take-home pay in those two ways in February.
If the worker should lose his or her job in Britain, unemployment benefit in the UK is equivalent to more than twice the take-home pay at the minimum wage in Romania or Bulgaria.
Compared to take-home pay, initial mortgage payments are now at their lowest level since 2003, just above the long-run average of 29%.
Working out your take-home pay can be tricky but Pulse Umbrella make it easy for you with their contractor calculator ( http://www.
The lower tax rate would boost take-home pay in 2011 by about $800 for individuals with an income of $40,000 per year, for example.
Low-paid working people need to have their pay raised to a take-home pay of pounds 300 a week minimum after tax and insurance have been taken out.
On average take-home pay of pounds 1,583, most spend pounds 80 within 24 hours of being paid and have blown pounds 228 or nearly 15 per cent after 48 hours.
It is equal to the difference between labor costs to the employer and the net take-home pay of the employee, including any cash benefits received from government welfare programs.
Do the math: the payroll deductions reduce your taxable income and may actually increase your take-home pay.
Many were employed at the time of their interviews and some had the opportunity to purchase insurance, but for amounts that would significantly reduce their take-home pay, making it unaffordable.