take


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Take

(1) To agree to buy. A dealer or customer who agrees to buy at another dealer's offered price is said to take the offer. (2) Euro bankers speak of taking deposits rather than buying money.

Take a Position

The state of owning or owing a security or other asset. One has a long position when one owns something, while one has a short position when something is sold, especially sold short. See also: Close a position.

take

To accept the price at which a dealer offers a security.

take

(1) A generic term meaning to acquire title by whatever means, such as by deed, by will, by purchase,or by gift,to name a few.(2) A common expression for a condemnation under the power of eminent domain.

References in classic literature ?
So I writ a letter while I was out, and put it in the post-office, telling of 'em how all was as 'tis; and that I should come down tomorrow to unload my mind of what little needs a-doing of down theer, and, most-like, take my farewell leave of Yarmouth.
He takes advantage because he's on that outlying farm, and thinks I shall forget him.
I pointed to the dead rat, smiling, and making other signs to show I was not hurt; whereat she was extremely rejoiced, calling the maid to take up the dead rat with a pair of tongs, and throw it out of the window.
Noureddin did as Hagi Hassan advised, to the great wrath of Saouy, who riding straight at him endeavoured to take the beautiful Persian from him by force.
Senor, you have ended this perilous adventure more safely for yourself than any of those I have seen: perhaps these people, though beaten and routed, may bethink themselves that it is a single man that has beaten them, and feeling sore and ashamed of it may take heart and come in search of us and give us trouble enough.
Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright and sending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take more than Neptune to cure that eye of yours.
So that in respect to those subject states he has not to take any trouble to gain them over to himself, for the whole of them quickly rally to the state which he has acquired there.
Jove, moreover, has vouchsafed you to wield the sceptre and to uphold righteousness, that you may take thought for your people under you; therefore it behooves you above all others both to speak and to give ear, and to out the counsel of another who shall have been minded to speak wisely.
Take-it-easy," cried I, "why take up your residence here, of all places in the world?
Then Gretel called out to her master: 'If the guest does not come, I must take the fowls away from the fire, but it will be a sin and a shame if they are not eaten the moment they are at their juiciest.
He spoke in a pleasant voice, with well-chosen words, and he seemed to take a discreet pleasure in their careful arrangement.
There's only one thing to do: take another drink and forget it.