SYR

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SYR

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Syria. The code is used for transactions to and from Syrian bank accounts and for international shipping to Syria. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carefully remove them using a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper for a few seconds, then gently place them into the ice-cold sugar syrup, ladling plenty over the top of each plait to give a good dousing.
Many people prefer a lighter syrup on pancakes and waffles, but chefs generally gravitate toward a darker, more robust maple syrup when cooking with it or using it with savory foods.
Instead, syrup is classified into four Grade A color classes with more descriptive names: Golden Maple Syrup with a Delicate Taste; Amber Maple Syrup with a Rich Taste; Dark Maple Syrup with Robust Taste; and Very Dark Maple Syrup with a Strong Taste.
We are very excited to celebrate maple syrup made across all of North America," said Snowday founder Jordyn Lexton.
Drizzle with the rest of the kirsch syrup, then fold the excess clingfilm over the top to seal.
Perhaps the most interesting part of the story, however, was that the stolen syrup was part of what is considered Canada's "strategic maple syrup reserve.
Pierre told the CBC his company was not involved in the maple syrup theft and claimed he bought the syrup from a supplier that he deals with regularly.
Dartmouth researchers and others have previously called attention to the potential for consuming harmful levels of arsenic via rice, and organic brown rice syrup may be the latest culprit on the scene.
Tree syrups are produced from sap drawn from a tree using a tap; the sap is then boiled down to create a more viscous syrup.
Maple syrup is made from the sap of sugar maple trees.
Sweet Freedom can be used to replace sugar, artificial sweeteners, honey, HFCS, glucose / gomme syrup, golden syrup, maple syrup, agave syrup and rice syrups in a wide variety of food and drink products.
Yes, you can make syrup from Silver, Red, Ash-leafed Maples (box elder), and even birch trees.