Market Surveillance

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Market Surveillance

On NASDAQ, a department that investigates and reports any suspected illegal behavior. Market Surveillance is an important department in maintaining a free, fair, and transparent market. Because NASDAQ is an electronic exchange, Market Surveillance conducts most of its investigations on computers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Or has the recreational surveillance of reality TV and the Internet inured us to such intrusions ?
Surveillance programs could help colleges comply with SEVIS by tracking and organizing online communication and activities, says Chronicle Solutions Chief Operating Officer Sophie Pibouin.
Like Shamrock, these new surveillance programs lack any sanction in federal statute.
The source of the isolated H5N1 is unknown, but our 8-month prospective surveillance program showed that it was recently introduced into this infected flock.
Even if we assume the president was given the power to authorize warrantless surveillance of American citizens under his "commander-in-chief" authority in the U.
In Los Angeles, surveillance devices increasingly are used by government to patrol public places.
Thus, the types of data collected, the frequency of data collection, the location of data collection, and the collection methods may be optimal for enforcement activities but are less than ideal for public health surveillance use.
Once investigators decide that surveillance is appropriate, their agency's policy will determine what levels of authorization are needed and how to allocate the necessary resources to the surveillance.
recorder or VCR, VideoSave rescues the surveillance record from this legal limbo and transmits video evidence via the Internet to VideoSave's secure offsite video vault.
Rather than simply assert that surveillance technologies are "creepy"--the standard rollback of privacy advocates--Rosen lays out the threats that inadequately restrained surveillance can pose, even to those who have nothing much to hide.