suitor

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Suitor

A company that makes an offer to buy another company. The term has a positive connotation and may therefore refer especially to a friendly takeover attempt. See also: White Knight, Acquiring firm.

suitor

A company that offers to purchase another firm.
References in classic literature ?
Her nets were so well laid that the luckless suitors were all caught, and succumbed to the test she applied to them without their knowledge.
In the meantime I will go to Ithaca, to put heart into Ulysses' son Telemachus; I will embolden him to call the Achaeans in assembly, and speak out to the suitors of his mother Penelope, who persist in eating up any number of his sheep and oxen; I will also conduct him to Sparta and to Pylos, to see if he can hear anything about the return of his dear father--for this will make people speak well of him.
For corruption: do not only bind thine own hands, or thy servants' hands, from taking, but bind the hands of suitors also, from offering.
When it became known that the old fox was dead, suitors presented themselves.
The very solicitors' boys who have kept the wretched suitors at bay, by protesting time out of mind that Mr.
The two pretty young Princesses Gorchakov met suitors there and were married and so further increased the fame of these dances.
This lady was so lovely and so rich that her fame had spread over all the world till "the four winds blow in from every coast renowned suitors.
But the "Odyssey" itself left much untold: what, for example, happened in Ithaca after the slaying of the suitors, and what was the ultimate fate of Odysseus?
It could not at the time be imagined that her passion for science would lead her so far as to refuse all the suitors who presented themselves to her for over fifteen years.
It all began with my hearing a strange rumour from Thedora--namely, that an unworthy suitor had been to visit you, and had insulted you with an improper proposal.
The suitor repairs not to the bower of his mistress, but to her father's lodge, and throws down a present at his feet.
Athelny for some fantastic reason took it into his head to discourse upon Byzantine history; he had been reading the later volumes of the Decline and Fall; and, his forefinger dramatically extended, he poured into the astonished ears of the suitor scandalous stories about Theodora and Irene.